Category Archives: Social Business

College = Employment

Groans and whining; that’s all I heard while listening to my previous student describe her experience at a student job fair:

“It was the same old, same old.  I pitched the same monologue over and over while shaking the hands of local employers in hopes that I land a job after graduation.  Why do I have to work so hard for only a few potential jobs?  It seems like someone should have invented a more efficient way for students to land a cool job by now… isn’t this the 21st century?”

Looking at her with amusement, I shook my head in agreement before replying, “Check out Presentfull.com”.

You see, until now, colleges and universities have used traditional, localized methods to introduce students to the workforce.  It has been a difficult task that requires significant time, staffing, and institutional resources.  Many postsecondary institutions cannot afford student employment resources which leave students to experiment with employment challenges alone.  Fortunately, higher education can now use social media to achieve our instiutional mission faster and more efficiently.

Presentfull.com offers a more effective approach to increase student employment rates.  If enrolled in college, a student can create a free profile to market themselves and apply for internships, part-time, and full-time jobs.  Presentfull’s international student employment website has officially launched this month in the United States. I suggest that students, higher education, and the business sector explore its usefulness.

Think about it…no more door-to-door, hope to get an interview, inefficient employment plans.  You now have the freedom to brand yourself as a qualified professional from the comfort of your own home.   Presentfull.com is a new resource for college students to introduce themselves, develop and promote their resume, network with local and international companies, and apply for jobs all on one website.  Did I mention it’s free?!

How can your business benefit from having a free profile on Presentfull.com?  How can college students benefit from marketing their skills and applying to jobs all around the world? How can professors use Presentfull to increase student engagement and learning? And lastly, how can higher education benefit from using Presentfull’s resources?

  • Business Benefits- Open access to qualified college students interested in internships, part-time jobs, and full-time careers at your company.
  • College Student Benefits- Increase professional network of potential employers and business partners, apply for internships, part-time jobs, and full-time careers on a local level and international level, and engage with other students and college professors.
  • Professor Benefits- Familiarize yourself with students, create a free class discussion forum, introduce your students to open job opportunities that correspond with your course topic, and invite business professionals to speak to your class as guest experts.
  • Higher Education Benefits- Free and streamlined student career planning: resume/CV development, Video Resume development, Cover Letter/Letter of Interest development, application station, mentor and network center.

Check out Presentfull.com for yourself by creating a free profile. Let me know what you think.

Also, congratulations to all 2012 graduating college students and incoming fall senior college students. I hope the Presentfull.com resource helps you get the job/internship that makes you very happy and successful. Good luck. -Tara

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Filed under Higher Education, Social Business

4 Twitter Tips for Professors

1.)    Use Twitter to get to know your students, have them get to know each other, get to know previous students, campus clubs and resources, and department faculty early in the semester.

(Twitter can contribute toward greater student engagement, interest, and utilization of campus resources that compliment your teaching objectives)

2.)    Have on-going, real-time discussions about current events related to your learning objectives.  

(Unleash student creativity, interest in your topic, Twitter autonomy, and cyber collaboration; it contributes to student success in greater capacities than traditional instruction can provide)

3.)    Introduce your students to other leading authors, speakers, and researchers in your industry while staying up-to-date with the most current articles, research studies, seminars, webinars, current events, etc. that relate to the syllabus.

(Twitter combines “what you know” with “who you know”; this not only helps them learn the course content faster but also sets them up for future networking and professional opportunities)

4.)    Create a Hashtab and TweetChat forum for your class to discuss topics during conferences, seminars, or webinars.

(Class discussion during a meeting, online webinar, guest speaker, conference, etc., can stimulate greater student collaboration, engagement/interest in the topic, and lead to further investigative cyber research. TweetChat forums presuppose internet connection; therefore, students can check the references mentioned in the conference, research counter theories or opinions, collect supporting documents, etc. while still in the TweetChat discussion.  This leads to extraordinary learning)

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Filed under Higher Education, Social Business

You Are What You Tweet

Who are you on Twitter?  More importantly, how does the world perceive you based on your Twitter profile?  Did you know that what you tweet is just as important as who you follow? By Tweeting and following other profiles you create a unique personal brand.  Those investigating who you are make conclusions about you through both the direct (tweet) and indirect (who you follow) strategies which market your skills, interests, values, and priorities.  The Twitter profiles that you choose to follow reflect your purpose in life.  Dramatic? I think not.  If there’s truth in the saying, “your friends are a reflection of who you are”, than who you follow on Twitter is merely an extension of who you are on a global scale.

Ironically, who you follow and associate with on Twitter represents who you are to those who want to follow you.  (Still following?) You see, viewers can often determine where you live, where you went to school, what you do for work, your approximate income, age, gender, if you have a family, who your friends are, and who influences you just by reviewing the people and organizations that you follow on Twitter.  Viewers begin to see patterns and themes within your “Following” and hopefully, those are the messages you want to project.

For example, a law professor who follows other prestigious law professors, law firms, specialty law organization, and so forth reflects a consistent image devoted to the interest of law and justice.  If the law professor primarily followed physics, physics professors, and organizations devoted to physics, the professor’s personal brand would be inconsistent and distracting.  Depending on your motivation and use of Twitter, these distractions can weaken the integrity of your message.  Following other profiles on Twitter can create closer connections with people or organizations that share professional or personal interests, motivations, or commonalities with you.  Knowing this, Twitter users are able to infer who you are by reviewing not only your tweets, but who you follow.

What is it that you want to be known for?  Who you follow on Twitter reflects your interests, hobbies, language, culture, where you live, religion, humor, favorite television shows, books, sports teams, movies, etc.  Review your Twitter “Following” and decide if they are an appropriate reflection of yourself and the personal brand you want to be known for.

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Filed under Leadership, Social Business