Tag Archives: Organizational Change

Online Higher Education: A brief article review

No Financial Aid, No Problem. For-Profit University Sets $199-a-Month Tuition for Online Courses, is a Chronical of Higher Education article introducing a revolutionary higher education model about for-profit online education.  I analyzed the article using political, structural, human resource, and symbolic organizational frames recommended by Bolman and Deal (2008).  The article addressed the benefits, obstacles, and controversy surrounding online education.  Even though the article stated that its online student enrollment has increased 30 to 40 percent each year, what are some other confounding variables that affect students and higher education?  Furthermore, how do employers perceive an online degree and will that perception help or hinder an online graduate’s probability of being hired?  The increasingly popular online education system provides a self-paced model creating flexible student schedules and a pay-as-you-go payment plan.

The article mentioned that online, for-profit universities are also changing the role of faculty.  Instead of a professor, faculty members are “Course Mentors”.  Their primary responsibility is to teach with little or no advisement requirements.  Furthermore, “Course Mentors” have no grading responsibilities.  “Graders” are outsourced staff with the sole responsibility to assess and record student grades (having no instruction responsibilities).  Like the online education revolution, almost every major organizational change is accompanied by new policy, new problems, and new solutions.  The question is, will educational leaders resist or embrace the changes?  Information Technology (IT) and Social Business (SB) will continue to synergize with higher education.  It will be the innovators and educational leaders who study and restructure the use of IT and SB to produce our most desired outcomes.

We will witness many intended and unintended consequences resulting from for-profit, online education.  These changes will transform traditional scholar, instructor, administrator, and employer roles.  As we redesign the college experience to fit a 21 century culture, let’s reevaluate our mission and policies from a structural, political, symbolic, and human resource organizational frame.  This strategy will help us plan and implement new initiatives contributing to the most efficient, effective, and streamlined hybrid higher education system.

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Filed under Higher Education, Leadership

There’s No Stopping It: Social Media in Higher Education

As we know, higher education is slow to change.  Faculty and administrator resistance is enabled by the extensive matrix of institutional paperwork, procedures, hierarchies, and traditions. Those familiar with both business and higher education know that most colleges and universities lack critical application of technology and social media.  Think about how much more effective higher education could be if faculty, administration, departments, curriculum, and outreach used social media and social business to achieve their objectives.

The thing is, our digital culture won’t wait for higher education to discuss, rationalize, and slowly implement technology into their services.  Social media has already partnered with our students who use it all day, every day.  Yes, this includes during our class time (I know my students are surfing Facebook, LinkedIn, Klout, Twitter, Pinterest, Tumbler, Hootsuite, etc).  But now, how can I redesign my instructional methods to harness the power of social media to achieve my teaching objectives?  How can faculty and administrators use social media to increase student success and organizational change?  Furthermore, how can administration use social media to increase faculty and staff effectiveness, streamline employment practices, and increase job placement for our graduates?  In the near future, I will discuss these important questions through a blog series called Presentfull starting on Monday, June 18th, 2012.  This new company is helping to revolutionize higher education and more readily streamline a P16 environment.  Administrators, faculty, and staff will use this new social media application to find it directly contributes to institutional mission achievement.

Stay tuned, we live in an exciting time and I can’t wait until I can share it with you.

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Filed under Higher Education, Social Business