Tag Archives: Social Business

But I Have A College Degree….

At the closing of my office hours, a college student asked, “How can I become more professionally competitive before graduation?”.   When I inquired about her unique skills and experiences, she simply responded, “Well, I’ll soon have a college degree. Isn’t that enough?”.

Unfortunately, her response is quite common among college students.  Why do they think that a college degree equates to being valuable in the job market or even entitles them to a job after graduation?  IT DOESN’T!  Passing a class does not mean you have the qualifications to lead and administer many jobs. If fact, I would not hire many of my graduating college students.

A University colleague had mentioned that a basic college degree is just that, basic. He noted that many employers complain about how their new college graduate employees lack basic skills and struggle keeping up in today’s evolving business climate.  An increasingly popular expectation is that job applicants should have at least a college degree which makes other applicants with a unique skill, an advanced or professional degree, or some leadership or professional experience more valuable.  Having a mere college degree doesn’t mean you’ll be competitive in today’s job market and certainly doesn’t guarantee anyone a job after graduation.

I recommend that students develop and demonstrate unique skills before or during college that make them more competitive in our international job market.  So what does it take to stand out from the thousands of job seeking applicants?  I note a few key skills that can significantly make your resume shine in our globalized economy.

The first skill is to learn a second language.  (Many people outside the U.S. are laughing right now since it’s common for them to be fluent in two, three, or four languages). But for U.S. college students, learn a new language.  Bridging multiple languages is a true asset in almost all job markets and as globalization increases mobility, you can work in any location that you want, presupposing you have the ability to effectively communicate with the people in that area.  If you want to be highly competitive and a desired applicant, know at least a second language.

The second skill, is customer service communication skills. Regardless of your occupation, you most likely work with people in some degree.  Think of everyone you work with as a customer and provide your value to satisfy your responsibility to them.  As our planet blends into one big melting pot of nationalities, ethnicities, languages, religions, and life styles, you’re ability to work with diverse groups will make you a true competitor in the job market.  Operate from a server’s frame and practice interpersonal skills to be an effective communicator.

The last skill I recommend you consider having is social network skills.  This skill can be scary and intimidating for many but it’s an increasingly important skill for job seekers.  Even basic social networking skills can increase your worth as an employee if you market yourself professionally.  In the next few years, our world will experience significant dependency on technological applications.  So if you haven’t already, get in on the action by learning how to professionally use Facebook, Twitter, HootSuite, blogs, etc. and market your skills to future employers.

If I could go back in time to relive my college experience I would acquire all of these skills by committing to one academic and professional activity: Study Abroad.  Living in a non-English speaking country would help me learn a new language, effectively work with diverse groups, build leadership skills, and because I’d want to document my experience while sinuously communicating with family and friends back home, I’d also learn social media and technology communication skills.

When I read a college graduate’s application who has international experience on their resume, I see a competitive applicant.   For other helpful tips to increase your competitive edge, check out Social BusinessStudy Abroad or Skype Tips.

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Faculty Can Attract International Students & Faculty Using Social Business (In Nevada & Beyond)

Follow the link below for the PowerPoint Presentation: “Attracting International Students & Faculty via Social Business in Higher Education”

Social Business in Higher Education- IAIR 2013

Ppt Highlights

  • Social Business: Cyber marketing, networking, and publication via virtual platforms to promote a product or business.
  • Faculty can use the increasing traffic on social media sites to increase the attention to their research and institution.
  • Did you know that 70% of YouTube traffic comes from outside the U.S? Or that YouTube reaches more adults (ages: 18-34) than any cable network?
  • Consistent & transparent online  faculty personal branding can:

– Increase attention from students, faculty, donors, industry leaders, and others to faculty research, departments, & institutions

– Disseminate research faster and stimulate greater interest and collaboration in the field

– Increase professional development skills and make faculty more competitive in higher education markets

– Generate easier and faster communication as well as instructional resources

– Attract more international attention to faculty and their work 

As higher education becomes increasingly competitive, and the international student is sought after more by higher education institutions, faculty can help attract & recruit both in-state, out-of-state, and international students & faculty to their institution through social business strategies. Social business is cost effective and after its initial start-up, is easy to maintain.

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July 18, 2013 · 3:36 am

6 Tips for a Successful Skype Interview

The following tips are for job applicants about to have a Skype interview.  The suggestions are created from the interview panelist perspective and my next blog on Wednesday, June 6th will provide suggestions for interview panelists to make the process of a Skype interview better from an applicant’s perspective.

Six ways to increase your success during a Skype interview include:

1.) Be familiar with your video equipment before your begin.  The camera’s autofocus, your microphone volume level, the amount of laptop battery-life, and your internet signal strength are just a few tools that need to be considered and managed before you begin the interview.  I recommend practicing an hour before with a friend or colleague to ensure a streamlined presentation.  You and your interview panel will then be able to focus on the discussion and not be distracted by technical difficulties.

2.) Where is your camera positioned?  Avoid setting it on the desk below your head or on a shelf above you.  The outcomes of these two positions are unflattering and send mixed signals to the interview panel.  For example, I once interviewed a candidate and all I saw was the inside of his nostrils.  Ideally, we want to have a conversation with you at eye-level.  If your laptop or computer cannot dock a camera around eye-level, use another tool like a tripod.

3.) What is in the background? Make sure to eliminate distractions behind you so that the interviewers focus on you and not other things like your pictures, random people, a messy office, your library collection, or what’s going on outside of the window behind you. It’s funny how much an interview panel reads into the small things and even tries to infer who you are by what surrounds you. Make sure you’re sending the right message.

4.) Practice your eye contact.  Yes, talking into a camera can be awkward but Skype and other forms of virtual communication are here to stay; so you need to get comfortable and master the tools.  Before your Skype interview, practice speaking into the camera with your eye contact looking into the lens.  There isn’t anything more distracting or off-putting than someone whose eye contact is all over the place.  This is especially true when the applicant looks down at their own computer screen; all the interview panel sees is your eyelids.

5.) Professional appearance is up to you.  Digital interviews rely heavily on the first impression you make.  Besides dressing professionally, make sure that your LSF (lighting, sound, and camera frame) are how you want them.  I recommend a well-light environment that creates an up-beat and hopeful atmosphere.  Dark or overshadowed faces send heavy and sinister messages.  For sound, avoid rooms that echo and prevent interruptions such as phone calls, clock chimes, dogs barking, or doorbells ringing. Lastly, the frame refers to what the camera includes in your presentation.  Adjust the frame so that it records more than a super close headshot but don’t include your entire body.  I recommend your frame includes your upper torso (above your elbows and higher) to present a comfortable and professional video presence.

6) Be prepared.  Confidence and organization shine through Skype interviews and significantly affect your first impression.  Have a notepad, pen, a bottle of water, important questions for the interview panel, your resume, and the job description next to your computer (out-of-sight but clear and accessible if needed).  Remember, you’re interviewing the organization and interview panel just as much as they are interviewing you.  A goodness of fit should be established by you and them so show the panel that you’re really interested in their answers to your questions by taking notes and giving follow-up questions.  Also, try small-talk or casual jokes during the interview.  Most applicants using Skype are nervous and uncomfortable but preparation will help you be successfully memorable merely by being confident, comfortable, and prepared.

Good luck and let me know if this helps.

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4 Twitter Tips for Professors

1.)    Use Twitter to get to know your students, have them get to know each other, get to know previous students, campus clubs and resources, and department faculty early in the semester.

(Twitter can contribute toward greater student engagement, interest, and utilization of campus resources that compliment your teaching objectives)

2.)    Have on-going, real-time discussions about current events related to your learning objectives.  

(Unleash student creativity, interest in your topic, Twitter autonomy, and cyber collaboration; it contributes to student success in greater capacities than traditional instruction can provide)

3.)    Introduce your students to other leading authors, speakers, and researchers in your industry while staying up-to-date with the most current articles, research studies, seminars, webinars, current events, etc. that relate to the syllabus.

(Twitter combines “what you know” with “who you know”; this not only helps them learn the course content faster but also sets them up for future networking and professional opportunities)

4.)    Create a Hashtab and TweetChat forum for your class to discuss topics during conferences, seminars, or webinars.

(Class discussion during a meeting, online webinar, guest speaker, conference, etc., can stimulate greater student collaboration, engagement/interest in the topic, and lead to further investigative cyber research. TweetChat forums presuppose internet connection; therefore, students can check the references mentioned in the conference, research counter theories or opinions, collect supporting documents, etc. while still in the TweetChat discussion.  This leads to extraordinary learning)

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You Are What You Tweet

Who are you on Twitter?  More importantly, how does the world perceive you based on your Twitter profile?  Did you know that what you tweet is just as important as who you follow? By Tweeting and following other profiles you create a unique personal brand.  Those investigating who you are make conclusions about you through both the direct (tweet) and indirect (who you follow) strategies which market your skills, interests, values, and priorities.  The Twitter profiles that you choose to follow reflect your purpose in life.  Dramatic? I think not.  If there’s truth in the saying, “your friends are a reflection of who you are”, than who you follow on Twitter is merely an extension of who you are on a global scale.

Ironically, who you follow and associate with on Twitter represents who you are to those who want to follow you.  (Still following?) You see, viewers can often determine where you live, where you went to school, what you do for work, your approximate income, age, gender, if you have a family, who your friends are, and who influences you just by reviewing the people and organizations that you follow on Twitter.  Viewers begin to see patterns and themes within your “Following” and hopefully, those are the messages you want to project.

For example, a law professor who follows other prestigious law professors, law firms, specialty law organization, and so forth reflects a consistent image devoted to the interest of law and justice.  If the law professor primarily followed physics, physics professors, and organizations devoted to physics, the professor’s personal brand would be inconsistent and distracting.  Depending on your motivation and use of Twitter, these distractions can weaken the integrity of your message.  Following other profiles on Twitter can create closer connections with people or organizations that share professional or personal interests, motivations, or commonalities with you.  Knowing this, Twitter users are able to infer who you are by reviewing not only your tweets, but who you follow.

What is it that you want to be known for?  Who you follow on Twitter reflects your interests, hobbies, language, culture, where you live, religion, humor, favorite television shows, books, sports teams, movies, etc.  Review your Twitter “Following” and decide if they are an appropriate reflection of yourself and the personal brand you want to be known for.

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Online Higher Education: A brief article review

No Financial Aid, No Problem. For-Profit University Sets $199-a-Month Tuition for Online Courses, is a Chronical of Higher Education article introducing a revolutionary higher education model about for-profit online education.  I analyzed the article using political, structural, human resource, and symbolic organizational frames recommended by Bolman and Deal (2008).  The article addressed the benefits, obstacles, and controversy surrounding online education.  Even though the article stated that its online student enrollment has increased 30 to 40 percent each year, what are some other confounding variables that affect students and higher education?  Furthermore, how do employers perceive an online degree and will that perception help or hinder an online graduate’s probability of being hired?  The increasingly popular online education system provides a self-paced model creating flexible student schedules and a pay-as-you-go payment plan.

The article mentioned that online, for-profit universities are also changing the role of faculty.  Instead of a professor, faculty members are “Course Mentors”.  Their primary responsibility is to teach with little or no advisement requirements.  Furthermore, “Course Mentors” have no grading responsibilities.  “Graders” are outsourced staff with the sole responsibility to assess and record student grades (having no instruction responsibilities).  Like the online education revolution, almost every major organizational change is accompanied by new policy, new problems, and new solutions.  The question is, will educational leaders resist or embrace the changes?  Information Technology (IT) and Social Business (SB) will continue to synergize with higher education.  It will be the innovators and educational leaders who study and restructure the use of IT and SB to produce our most desired outcomes.

We will witness many intended and unintended consequences resulting from for-profit, online education.  These changes will transform traditional scholar, instructor, administrator, and employer roles.  As we redesign the college experience to fit a 21 century culture, let’s reevaluate our mission and policies from a structural, political, symbolic, and human resource organizational frame.  This strategy will help us plan and implement new initiatives contributing to the most efficient, effective, and streamlined hybrid higher education system.

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There’s No Stopping It: Social Media in Higher Education

As we know, higher education is slow to change.  Faculty and administrator resistance is enabled by the extensive matrix of institutional paperwork, procedures, hierarchies, and traditions. Those familiar with both business and higher education know that most colleges and universities lack critical application of technology and social media.  Think about how much more effective higher education could be if faculty, administration, departments, curriculum, and outreach used social media and social business to achieve their objectives.

The thing is, our digital culture won’t wait for higher education to discuss, rationalize, and slowly implement technology into their services.  Social media has already partnered with our students who use it all day, every day.  Yes, this includes during our class time (I know my students are surfing Facebook, LinkedIn, Klout, Twitter, Pinterest, Tumbler, Hootsuite, etc).  But now, how can I redesign my instructional methods to harness the power of social media to achieve my teaching objectives?  How can faculty and administrators use social media to increase student success and organizational change?  Furthermore, how can administration use social media to increase faculty and staff effectiveness, streamline employment practices, and increase job placement for our graduates?  In the near future, I will discuss these important questions through a blog series called Presentfull starting on Monday, June 18th, 2012.  This new company is helping to revolutionize higher education and more readily streamline a P16 environment.  Administrators, faculty, and staff will use this new social media application to find it directly contributes to institutional mission achievement.

Stay tuned, we live in an exciting time and I can’t wait until I can share it with you.

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Social Business in Higher Education: Increasing Faculty Competitiveness

The following Screenr introduces a newer concept in higher education: Social Business can increase faculty competitiveness to both support research and job security.

For further information regarding my Social Network Equation mentioned in the Screenr presentation, please visit: Social Network Equation.

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Blogging 101 for Educational Leaders

[The attached video is an interview with Dr. Bret Simmons, a College of Business Associate Professor of Management at the University of Nevada, Reno.  His extensive research and experience in management, leadership, and social business contributes significant merit to our discussion about faculty or administrators developing and managing a blog.]

Lately, higher education faculty and administrators, perplexed about the blogging culture, have approached me with specific questions regarding how to start a blog.  Confusion about blogging formats, tone, purpose, length, and how often to post are blogging barriers for many academics.  This blog will respond to their concerns in hopes of helping to reduce initial blogging intimidation or anxiety.

Social media will continue being a significant influence in post-secondary education instruction and communication. Did you know that there are more than 160 million public blogs and over 180,000 blogs created every day?  Faculty and administrators have the duty to adapt, master, and lead educational instruction and research dissemination through technology.  Blogging is one strategy to accomplish these goals.  Blogging is a way to network with leading scholars, analyze current studies, and develop co-collaborative publications.  It also is an effective way to test theories and receive feedback on article topics.  Blogging should not hinder a faculty or administrator’s ability to lead but instead be effective means of increasing student learning and research development.  By introducing the usefulness and inclusivity of blogging to faculty and administrators, misconceptions and hesitations of blogging in academia will dissolve.

Remember to relax and have fun; it’s a blog not an APA 6th edition research paper.  Blogging is an opportunity to have real-time, relevant conversations that contribute original knowledge within your industry.  Educators should be at least familiar with blogging as a means to research and converse with leading professionals, increase professional competitiveness, increase college recognition, and increase instructional effectiveness.  So blog responsibly, discern reliable and valid internet resources from extraneous materials, and be known for relevant, valid, and reliable content.

A few free blog websites where you may choose to start your own include WordPress, Blogger, LiveJournal, Blog.com, & Weebly.

Blog examples include: Bret Simmons, Greg Mankiw, Seth Godin, Gerald Lucas, Craig Monk, Bob Sutton, Tom Peters, LawProfessorBlogs, and Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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6 Ways Blogging Can Make You a Better Scholarly Writer

We often hear that social media publications are less important and inferior to peer reviewed journal publications.  Faculty and researchers are discouraged from distractive activities such as blogging, tweeting, or social media communications. Many departments completely ignore social media application in order to focus on more traditional research and instructional methods.  Ironically, it turns out that in today’s digital society, researchers and writers actually improve scholarly publication skills through blogging. The following are six ways that blogging can make you a better scholarly writer:

1. Practice makes perfect:

The more experience a writer has, the faster he or she will develop advanced writing skills.  Original ideas organized and communicated effectively via blogging provide scholarly writers the platform to practice writing articles and to receive feedback.  Blogging is a metacognitive activity that encourages stronger and more creative writing abilities. Reading blogs will also introduce different viewpoints and organizational frames to consider including in future scholarly articles.  The more exposure and experience with disseminating data, the better.

2. Research feedback: 

Writers make their scholarly articles better by seeking peer reviewed feedback in order to build the strongest paper possible.  Traditionally, we ask faculty or friends for their opinions but now, with social media, it is possible to expand our peer reviewing network to include researchers, faculty, students, and nonacademic professionals from all around the world. Blogging is free, instantaneous, international, and informal.  Interactive blogging provides multiple perspectives and suggestions to incorporate into an article or support an original premise. Before submitting a finished article to a peer-reviewed journal, try breaking it up into one or more blogs and test it within a social discussion.  Blog writers will benefit from the interactive discussion and feedback.  These discussions often lead to future research and inspire new articles.

3. Collecting data:

Do you think you’re the only one contributing quality content on a particular topic?  There are over 160 million public blogs and over 180,000 blogs created every day.  Think about the amount of knowledge and experience circulating the web about your interests? To gain access to current data, writers need to go no further than their own computer. Books and journal articles take a long time to publish.  Blogging allows you to read about what other researching leaders are currently working on. This helps you to collect relevant data and maintain your leadership position within your field.

We are no longer limited to only peer-reviewed journal articles for valid data.  We can use blogs to find prestigious scholars, read about their work, and then link to the author’s published article.  Also, by reading blogs that contradict or challenge your own hypothesis, you can gain a better understanding about the topics you want to write about. By challenging other countering principles, and defending your own, you will become a stronger writer. Blogs will provide you with a more robust foundation of data while leading you to new authors, research, or scholarly articles.

4. Scholarly recognition:

Blog sites can be used to organize your data and clearly demonstrate your research line.  Because it chronologically records and displays your digital publications, you may build upon previous research.  Your blogs will be referenced by scholars of all skill levels who will then refer you to their colleagues and friends.  You will be considered a leader in your industry; actively publishing and searching for effective outcomes. Others interested in your field will be able to follow your research more easily. Blogging also provides potential collaborative partnerhships for future research with leaders from all over the world. The best part is, the international researchers will come to you.

5. Professional development:

Blogging sites allow you to publish your curriculum vitae or resume that potential employers, hiring committees, and journal review panels can refer to while considering your expertise. Blogging allows you to format your presentations and publications in a causal style using video blogs, PowerPoint, Screenr, or traditional articles. Grants and service can also be displayed on blog sites or hyperlinked to other sites displaying such committee work, scholarly awards, or other related achievements.  By producing a quality blog site, writers will practice their scholarly abilities while developing a professional image and brand as a writer.

6. From blog to book:

Once you have established a thorough line of valid blogs that complete a research hypothesis or provide substantial original content, it is to time consolidate the individual publications into a streamlined book. Many scholarly writers aim to design and write a book.  Blogging helps to structure the book one blog at a time.  If organized effectively, each blog could be a chapter of your next book. After addressing online responses, discussions, feedback, and revisions of your blog entries, you can consolidate a series of related blogs into one book for publication.

The residual ignorance, fear, and hesitation lingering amongst traditional scholars will inhibit not only their publication abilities but those of whom within their apprentise or mentoring relationship. In the past, it has been easier for faculty and scholars to simply overlook the importance of social media within Higher Education; but now, today’s publish or perish culture within a digital society demands that educational leaders embrace blog techniques amongst other strategies to enhance the industry.  Blogging will expand the scope of writers’ publishing abilities while increasing their influential reach across the web. Blogging can improve scholarly writing skills, increase publication rates, and expand professional networks.

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