Tag Archives: Leadership

Love This Quote About “Truths”

WOrld

“Truth can be stated in a thousand different ways, yet each one can be true.”

~ Swami Vivekananda

One of my major takeaways after working with thousands of international students, scholars, and visiting faculty, is that truth, although true for the beholder, is different for each person.  Pending his or her cultural background and personal experiences, we speak truths from of own perspective.  Thus, we often misunderstand the intentions of those who operate from alternative truths.

It turns out though, that if we take the time to learn accurate information about others’ cultural frameworks and perspectives, their truths make sense too.  The trick is taking the time to learn and making sure the content aligns with the targeted demographic.

By doing this, we bridge invisible gaps and minimize barriers which keep us separated, ignorant, in fear or in competition with those we don’t understand.  By knowing more about another person’s culture, we empower ourselves to communicate more effectively with them.  We also begin to more easily navigate with people from diverse backgrounds.  Our newly understood truths form mutual respect and lead to new ways to live peacefully together.

We see more bridging between differing cultures occur more and more in businesses that work across multiple countries, at universities with international education programs, with government and non-profit organizations.  That’s why www.CulturallyConfident.com provides classes, workshop training, and camps to teach students, employees, and faculty the skills they need in our ever increasing global economy.

There are so many ways to apply the class content for academic or professional goals.

Here are increases that class participants reported from completing cultural bridge class:

  • Intercultural Adjustment and Integration
  • Self-Awareness and Critical Thinking Skills
  • Intercultural Negotiation and Conflict Resolution
  • International Leadership Skills
  • Academic and Workplace Readiness
  • Cross-cultural Communication Skills
  • Intercultural Team Collaboration
  • Self-Confidence and Overall Relocation Satisfaction

For more information about the classes, workshops, or orientations, contact me at tara@hlslinstitute.com

For more class and camp information, visit www.CulturallyConfident.com

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Filed under Higher Education, Leadership, Study Abroad

WEBINAR: The Best Way To Prepare for USA Study

FREE Webinar Training + U.S. University Class Discount

With Dr. Tara Madden-Dent

Wednesday: February 24

  • 6:00PM/1800 Indonesia and Thailand

  • 7:00PM/1900 China and Taiwan

  • 8:00PM/2000 Japan and South Korea

    Don’t wait until you’re in the USA to begin class.             
    International students don’t always get the classes they want and it can delay their progress towards graduation.

Join the Free webinar to learn how:

  • To enroll in your first U.S. university class “U.S. Academics and Culture” and finish it online at home!

  • To learn western study skills, how to earn better grades, how to make U.S. friends, how to network and other professional skills for the USA.

  • To earn 3 course credits on a transferable U.S. transcript!
  • To earn a Letter of Recommendation (in English) by a U.S. Professor!
  • To earn a Certificate of Completion (In English) for their resume!
Be prepared for success in the USA by
Registering for the Free Webinar at:

https://usaconline.leadpages.co/usa-university-webinar/

____________________________________________________

Visit www.usac.online for more information about the class or contact matthew@hlslinstitute.com.

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HLSL INSTITUTE, USA

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Why study YOU before attending college?

After many years of teaching university students, the most powerful and influential lessons the undergraduates and graduate students preferred were the assignments which encompassed personal reflection and experiential learning.  These students described that studying the course’s learning objectives with personal exploration pedagogies, challenged their original worldviews, felt liberated from previous subconscious mental programs, and more confident to apply their new knowledge in everyday life decisions.  Many students reported that the self-awareness contributed to a clearer understanding of how they would move forward after the course to intentionally advance their professional and academic careers.

One student’s evaluation submission summarized the consensus nicely,

“For the four years of college courses I have experienced, this was by far, the most rewarding on every level and one of my favorites. I have never experienced such valuable information in a class that comes up in everyday life. The extremely eye-opening experiences and class material helped me stretch myself as an individual during the papers and class activities. I came out of this class with observations and feelings that I never knew I had.  I not only gained knowledge to apply to my future career, but I gained more self-confidence and really pushed myself to grow as a person.”

As an educator, there is no greater joy than witnessing my students demonstrate new skills, knowledge, and self-awareness.  Although my courses focused primarily on law, educational leadership, multiculturalism, and societal studies, many of the students reported that their experience was the closest thing they had ever had to a formal Self-Study course. 

Instead of waiting until adulthood to formally study the Self , what if actual “Self-Studies” courses were incorporated into elementary, middle and high school educational programs alongside required subjects like reading, writing, and math? Would it make a difference on the student’s development, their worldview, ethics, community engagement, health, grades, career choice, interpersonal relationships, financial stability, emotional intelligence, and long-term achievements? How would studying the Self influence the educational system, the city, state, nation, and planet?

Before we go any further, let’s understand the term “Self-Studies” to represent a formal course, grounded on legitimate peer-reviewed, tested, published research, and facilitated by well trained and highly qualified instructors whose aim is to foster individualized identity development and personal growth through self-reflection and experiential learning to encourage emotional intelligence, purposeful living, goal achievement, healthy lifestyles and interpersonal relationships, environmental awareness, and community contribution.

Based on that definition, that not one of my own alma maters had offered a Self-Studies course in my programs of study.  That’s a big deal considering that I have earned a high school diploma, college degree, and multiple graduate degrees (M.A.; Ph.D.).  How much more powerful would my academic, personal, and professional contributions be if my primary and secondary schools had offered courses like Mindfulness; Personal Habits and Behaviors; Core Principles and Values; Family and Cultural Influences; Healthy Relationships; Emotional Intelligence; Identity Exploration; My impact on Modern Society and the Environment; My Culture and how it Compares to others; and Financial Goal Planning? If I, as a young person, had studied where I came from, what I stood for, who I believe I am, how I would contribute my value to society, and who I wanted to share my life with, how would things be different today?

Only now, after 31 years, I’ve finally completed my first formal Self-Study program and recognize the tremendous power it provides.  The self-discoveries are tremendously helpful to grasp why I live the way I do and how I want to live from this point forward to achieve a clear, laser-focused goal.  We are seeing a movement across the United States of personal success courses emphasizing self-study, goal planning, networking, communication, and professional skills development to generate healthy, happy, skilled members of our society and workforce.  PSI Seminars, is one personal success educational organization that provides Self-Study courses that teach personal exploration to enable students to live with a better understanding of who they are, what they want, and how they can apply their unique abilities in daily life and achieve long-term goals.  Another organization, called One Life Fully Lived, is an example of personal development through self-study aiming to develop identify, core values, and personal life goals.

Because I’m an academic junky and educational advocate, I recommend Self-Studies as an early means to generate self-awareness that supports a lifetime of academic, professional, spiritual, social, emotional, physical, and financial successes. 

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Filed under Higher Education, U.S. Culture

You Are What You Tweet

Who are you on Twitter?  More importantly, how does the world perceive you based on your Twitter profile?  Did you know that what you tweet is just as important as who you follow? By Tweeting and following other profiles you create a unique personal brand.  Those investigating who you are make conclusions about you through both the direct (tweet) and indirect (who you follow) strategies which market your skills, interests, values, and priorities.  The Twitter profiles that you choose to follow reflect your purpose in life.  Dramatic? I think not.  If there’s truth in the saying, “your friends are a reflection of who you are”, than who you follow on Twitter is merely an extension of who you are on a global scale.

Ironically, who you follow and associate with on Twitter represents who you are to those who want to follow you.  (Still following?) You see, viewers can often determine where you live, where you went to school, what you do for work, your approximate income, age, gender, if you have a family, who your friends are, and who influences you just by reviewing the people and organizations that you follow on Twitter.  Viewers begin to see patterns and themes within your “Following” and hopefully, those are the messages you want to project.

For example, a law professor who follows other prestigious law professors, law firms, specialty law organization, and so forth reflects a consistent image devoted to the interest of law and justice.  If the law professor primarily followed physics, physics professors, and organizations devoted to physics, the professor’s personal brand would be inconsistent and distracting.  Depending on your motivation and use of Twitter, these distractions can weaken the integrity of your message.  Following other profiles on Twitter can create closer connections with people or organizations that share professional or personal interests, motivations, or commonalities with you.  Knowing this, Twitter users are able to infer who you are by reviewing not only your tweets, but who you follow.

What is it that you want to be known for?  Who you follow on Twitter reflects your interests, hobbies, language, culture, where you live, religion, humor, favorite television shows, books, sports teams, movies, etc.  Review your Twitter “Following” and decide if they are an appropriate reflection of yourself and the personal brand you want to be known for.

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Filed under Leadership, Social Business

New Study: Mentoring Impacts More Than Graduation Rates

“Mentoring” can be defined as the structured, intentional and sustainable relationship between a person with more experience and knowledge (mentor) and a person with less experience and knowledge (mentee). Research has shown that mentored relationships can encourage professional and personal success, and that pre-college programs that include mentoring can more effectively help students transition from high school to college. However, a recent study conducted by the University of Nevada, Reno College of Education suggests that the act of mentoring can contribute just as many positive outcomes for mentors as it does for mentees.

The study looked at college student mentors of sixth through twelfth grade students in the University’s Dean’s Future Scholars program. The program is an outreach, research-based mentoring approach to increase high school graduation rates and college enrollment for first-generation, low-income students. In the study, the college student mentors identified themes of how mentoring affected their own lives. The college mentors stated that being a mentor enabled them to reflect on their own behaviors as a student and make better decisions leading to their own success. As a result, the mentors believed it had inspired greater motivation for achievement, improved their own study and work habits, increased their accountability to faculty, and caused them to reevaluate their own professional goals. The lesson learned: being a mentor is more than supporting the goals of another. It is an opportunity to reflect on one’s own behavior, strategies and goals. Mentoring is a win-win situation for both those aspiring to attend college in the future, as well as for current college students who serve as their mentors.

The sixth through twelfth grader students who participated in the Dean’s Future Scholars Program since its foundation in 2000, have been given the knowledge, skills, direction and support to make the decisions necessary to graduate from high school and complete college. The program recruits students during their sixth-grade year from Washoe County School District Title I schools and mentors them through high school and college. The program has established a homegrown, sustainable educational model resulting in a 90 percent and 86 percent high school graduation rate of participants the last two years, respectively. This is significant when compared to Nevada’s high school graduation rate of 56 percent and the national average graduation rate of 74 percent.

The program requires students to meet with a college student mentor regularly to review grades, establish goals, make sure the necessary steps are taken to fulfill high school graduation requirements, and plan for college. The program also hosts a summer program to provide high school math courses, early college credit and an introduction to college life. It provides tutoring, examination preparation, community service projects, campus internships, college application assistance and financial aid. The program is largely funded by private donations and grants, along with campus resources.

The mentoring component is key to any academic or professional program. Aspiring college students should consider inviting a trustworthy, knowledgeable and experienced mentor to provide guidance in their lives, and trustworthy, knowledgeable and experienced professionals should consider mentoring students. To watch a short interview with Bob Edgington, director of the Dean’s Future Scholars Program, visit http://ow.ly/adKb5. Or, for more information on the program, contact Bob Edgington at 775-784-4237 or bobdfs@unr.edu.

 

Co-authors: Tara Madden-Dent & Dr. Patricia Miltenberger

Tara Madden-Dent is a Nevada Law Instructor and PhD Candidate in higher education administration at the University of Nevada, Reno College of Education; http://taramaddendent.com  http://twitter.com/#!/DrTaraMDent   http://www.linkedin.com/in/taramaddendent

Dr. Patricia Miltenberger is professor emeritus of higher education administration at the University of Nevada, Reno College of Education. http://wolfweb.unr.edu/homepage/pmilten/  https://twitter.com/#!/coyotepat   http://www.linkedin.com/pub/pat-miltenberger/20/719/38a

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Filed under Higher Education, Leadership

College Student Development

The most common theme I hear from my students is, “I’m not sure what I want to do”.  These college students are spending countless hours and money attending college and passing classes without really knowing who they are, who they want to be, or establishing professional goals. It’s almost as if they choose college majors based on everything but personal conviction and professional passion.  Why choose a major that you don’t love and can’t see yourself wanting to know more about the subject every day?  I know some students who have picked a degree based because it had the least number of required course credits for graduation. I wonder if that’s because some students are not sure what they want.  How important is it for a student to learn about them self, their ethics, their values, priorities, and specific goals and how would those insights impact college student success more than merely going through the motions until graduation?

Managing Oneself by Peter Drucker is a handy, quick read to stimulate self discovery and goal setting for all developing individuals; especially for college students.  The book is part of the Harvard Business Review Classic Series and was intended to shape best practices and leadership skills in managers. I believe that the concepts are significantly important for college students as well.  The concepts and lessons generate personal identification of values, ethics, and goals; everything that could help students better understand who they are now and who they want to become.

Each of the following sections are partnered with simple rational and multifaceted support guiding the reader to better understand their value system, their skills, develop a healthy professional motivation, and leads to setting professional goals:

What are my Strengths?

How do I perform?

Am I a reader or a listener?

How do I learn?

What are my values?

Where do I belong?

What should I contribute?

Responsibility for relationships

Cutting down the time students flip from one major to another will help them to graduate faster.  By narrowing their focus and aligning their passion with their studies will help them to enjoy their college experience and gain more from their research.  Managing Oneself introduces the important and critical qualities that young leaders should spend time on in order to be the most efficient in their own pursuits for success. If we’re asking our college graduates to make a choice and pick a career, let’s ensure that they’re equipped with the skills, self-identity, motivation, and personal conviction that contributes towards their graduation and professional success.

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Filed under Higher Education, Leadership

There’s No Stopping It: Social Media in Higher Education

As we know, higher education is slow to change.  Faculty and administrator resistance is enabled by the extensive matrix of institutional paperwork, procedures, hierarchies, and traditions. Those familiar with both business and higher education know that most colleges and universities lack critical application of technology and social media.  Think about how much more effective higher education could be if faculty, administration, departments, curriculum, and outreach used social media and social business to achieve their objectives.

The thing is, our digital culture won’t wait for higher education to discuss, rationalize, and slowly implement technology into their services.  Social media has already partnered with our students who use it all day, every day.  Yes, this includes during our class time (I know my students are surfing Facebook, LinkedIn, Klout, Twitter, Pinterest, Tumbler, Hootsuite, etc).  But now, how can I redesign my instructional methods to harness the power of social media to achieve my teaching objectives?  How can faculty and administrators use social media to increase student success and organizational change?  Furthermore, how can administration use social media to increase faculty and staff effectiveness, streamline employment practices, and increase job placement for our graduates?  In the near future, I will discuss these important questions through a blog series called Presentfull starting on Monday, June 18th, 2012.  This new company is helping to revolutionize higher education and more readily streamline a P16 environment.  Administrators, faculty, and staff will use this new social media application to find it directly contributes to institutional mission achievement.

Stay tuned, we live in an exciting time and I can’t wait until I can share it with you.

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Filed under Higher Education, Social Business