Tag Archives: Higher Education

Study Online and Earn University Credit BEFORE Applying to School

What is “U.S. Academics & Culture” online class?

THE OLDEST, MOST ADVANCED UNIVERSITY READINESS CLASS IN THE WORLD, TAUGHT ONLINE, WORTH EARN 3 UNIVERSITY CREDITS!

 1SlideHLSLFlyier

Students who pass the class earn:

  • U.S. strategies to succeed in western universities
  • Western communication and socialization skills
  • Three university credits on a U.S. transcript
  • Letter of Recommendation from a U.S. Professor (in English) to strengthen university applications and job resumes
  • Certificate of Competition to strengthen university applications and job resumes
  • Preferred acceptance into an elite 4-year private U.S. college

There’s no application and no English score required.  Visit http://www.hlslinstitute.com to enroll today!

Who can enroll?

  • International students 14 years old, or older
  • Students who can complete the class in English (No TOEFL required, but recommended score of 60 and higher)
  • Students who want to learn success skills for U.S. study
  • Students who want to become more competitive for school and job applications

When to enroll?

  • Simple answer, at anytime
  • A new class starts each first Monday of every month
    • The 2016 class schedule: Jan 18th, Feb 1st, March 7th, April 4th, May 2nd, July 5th, Aug 1st, Sept 6th, Oct 3rd, Nov 7th, and Dec 5th

How to enroll?

  • Click this “Enroll Now” link or the button below

How long does it take to finish the class? 

  • Students complete the class on their own pace. Some students take a couple weeks, some students take several.  All students must complete the class within 12 weeks.

How does this cost compare with the cost of taking 3 credits in the United States?

Cost Comparison

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Looking for a scholarship?  Partial scholarships are provided on a case by case basis.  Please click here to email our team.

Quotes

This on-line course will provide the keys to success for studies in the United States.  From how to effectively apply to your school of choice to strategies of how to integrate on campus when  you first arrive, Tara and her team will guide you through the entire process.Susie Askew, Director at the University of Nevada, Reno  Office of International Students and Scholars

Knowing culture before coming to U.S. decreases anxiety for adjusting to new country. Just for my culture, I think it’s really mandatory, before.” — Minjae L., Seoul, South Korea

This study is helpful for me. It helped mentally prepare me studying and to meeting new friends.” — Wei C., Shanghai, China

Knowing culture gave me confidence to talk, get involved, and participate.” — Wayne L., Beijing, China

 

 

FREE WEBINAR  – Wednesday, January 10, 2016

Register for the Webinar that Works Best for Your Time Zone:

WEBINAR 1:

Time: (Japan 1900 / 7 pm JST;    South Korea 1900 / 7 pm KST;    China 1800 / 6 pm CST)

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9134209712079716610
Webinar ID: 101-847-563    United States: +1 (415) 930-5321    Access Code: 337-877-485

 

WEBINAR 2:

Time: (Colombia and Peru 1800 / 6 pm COT;     USA  6 pm EST & 3 pm PST)

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5194110893457792258

Webinar ID: 113-033-235  United States: +1 (914) 614-3221    Access Code: 239-072-648

 

WEBINAR 3:

Time: (Western Europe and Central Africa  1800 / 6 pm CET,   UTC/GMT +1 hour)

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5892876921188446210

Webinar ID: 112-670-603  United States: +1 (562) 247-8422    Access Code: 166-492-316

 

WEBINAR 4:

Time: Kuwait and Saudi Arabia 1800 / 6 pm AST;      Brazil 2000 / 8 pm BRST

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/187050389286685954

Webinar ID: 111-060-659  United States: +1 (415) 930-5321   Access Code: 267-977-595

HLSL Institute

Our Mission

We improve the quality of life for international students by teaching U.S. academics and culture.  International students can more easily navigate U.S. university classrooms, campuses, and social networks to achieve academic, social, and professional goals.

Our Services

Since 2010, our team has been on the forefront of pre-departure research and instruction to support students pursuing study abroad.  We teach pre-departure and post-arrival classesthat help international students manage cultural and academic challenges associated with adjustment in new schools.

Through curriculum design, international teaching and presentations, online webinars, research, and publications, we provide international students with early, effective, and practical education so they live healthier, more successful, and happier lives.

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Filed under Higher Education, HLSL Institute, International Education

I’m a Ph.D. and LOVING IT! Watch my dissertation presentation in under 3 minutes.

It feels AMAZING to have walked across the stage at the University of Nevada’s graduation commencement to officially recognize my Ph.D. in Educational Leadership specializing in international education.  To top things off, I’ve received second place for a fun university competition called the “3 Minute Dissertation Presentation”.  My short (< 3 minute) video summarizes my dissertation.  My full +200 page paper is published through the ProQuest Dissertation Database.  To learn more about my research without reading the entire document, you can always post a comment on this blog and we’ll discuss it.

 

I look forward to applying my research as I teach international people pursuing life, work, and studies in the United States.  If you are interested in learning more about how I applying my findings into practice, visit HLSL Institute.  Not only am I working in the United States, but I am available for international speaking, teaching, and training assignments. Contact me and we’ll schedule your next cross-cultural preparation workshop or seminar to prepare students, employees, or family members for successful transition and adjustment into the U.S.

 

 

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Filed under Higher Education, International Education, Leadership

Video Interview: International Transition

Thanks to my UNR student Jessica for conducting an interview with Alexandra who came to America from El Salvador.  Alexandra revealed many interesting challenges that one faces when traveling to the United States from another country. These cross-cultural challenges bring many opportunities for new programs and ideas to help ease the transition into our very unique culture.

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Filed under Higher Education, International Education

But I Have A College Degree….

At the closing of my office hours, a college student asked, “How can I become more professionally competitive before graduation?”.   When I inquired about her unique skills and experiences, she simply responded, “Well, I’ll soon have a college degree. Isn’t that enough?”.

Unfortunately, her response is quite common among college students.  Why do they think that a college degree equates to being valuable in the job market or even entitles them to a job after graduation?  IT DOESN’T!  Passing a class does not mean you have the qualifications to lead and administer many jobs. If fact, I would not hire many of my graduating college students.

A University colleague had mentioned that a basic college degree is just that, basic. He noted that many employers complain about how their new college graduate employees lack basic skills and struggle keeping up in today’s evolving business climate.  An increasingly popular expectation is that job applicants should have at least a college degree which makes other applicants with a unique skill, an advanced or professional degree, or some leadership or professional experience more valuable.  Having a mere college degree doesn’t mean you’ll be competitive in today’s job market and certainly doesn’t guarantee anyone a job after graduation.

I recommend that students develop and demonstrate unique skills before or during college that make them more competitive in our international job market.  So what does it take to stand out from the thousands of job seeking applicants?  I note a few key skills that can significantly make your resume shine in our globalized economy.

The first skill is to learn a second language.  (Many people outside the U.S. are laughing right now since it’s common for them to be fluent in two, three, or four languages). But for U.S. college students, learn a new language.  Bridging multiple languages is a true asset in almost all job markets and as globalization increases mobility, you can work in any location that you want, presupposing you have the ability to effectively communicate with the people in that area.  If you want to be highly competitive and a desired applicant, know at least a second language.

The second skill, is customer service communication skills. Regardless of your occupation, you most likely work with people in some degree.  Think of everyone you work with as a customer and provide your value to satisfy your responsibility to them.  As our planet blends into one big melting pot of nationalities, ethnicities, languages, religions, and life styles, you’re ability to work with diverse groups will make you a true competitor in the job market.  Operate from a server’s frame and practice interpersonal skills to be an effective communicator.

The last skill I recommend you consider having is social network skills.  This skill can be scary and intimidating for many but it’s an increasingly important skill for job seekers.  Even basic social networking skills can increase your worth as an employee if you market yourself professionally.  In the next few years, our world will experience significant dependency on technological applications.  So if you haven’t already, get in on the action by learning how to professionally use Facebook, Twitter, HootSuite, blogs, etc. and market your skills to future employers.

If I could go back in time to relive my college experience I would acquire all of these skills by committing to one academic and professional activity: Study Abroad.  Living in a non-English speaking country would help me learn a new language, effectively work with diverse groups, build leadership skills, and because I’d want to document my experience while sinuously communicating with family and friends back home, I’d also learn social media and technology communication skills.

When I read a college graduate’s application who has international experience on their resume, I see a competitive applicant.   For other helpful tips to increase your competitive edge, check out Social BusinessStudy Abroad or Skype Tips.

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Filed under Higher Education, International Education

Can a hug discriminate?

Students at the University gave free hugs to strangers throughout Reno

 

Hugs on campusStudents from the University’s College of Education dispersed throughout Reno with “Free Hugs” signs to study preconceived prejudices and confront their fears. More than 700 voluntary hugs were given to strangers.What if a stranger offered you a free hug simply as a gesture of love, connection and comfort? What factors would impact your decision to accept or deny the embrace? Would it make a difference if the hug came from someone who looks like you instead of being a different race, age, weight, social class or culture? If so, why does it matter?

Students at the University of Nevada, Reno set out to personally experience this interaction through a Free Hugs activity that investigated the demographics and reactions of random strangers who accepted or denied a free hug. Students held a sign that stated “Free Hugs”, and waited for volunteering strangers to participate at various Reno locations.

The purpose of the assignment was two-fold.  First, students observed the behaviors of strangers’ who participated in the hug, avoided or dodged the hug, and those who only watched curiously from afar. Second, students reflected and analyzed their personal experiences before, during and after the activity including any concerns, prejudices or feelings.

The analysis resulted in several conclusions, including the acknowledgement of apprehension and identification of prejudices.

“There was a man that came up to me who wore a turban,” one student who conducted her activity at Truckee Meadows Community College said. “He asked if he could get a hug with his arms stretched out wide. I was nervous, but pushed that aside and said yes. The hug was normal like if I had hugged a friend. That surprised me. My rush of nervousness left as he walked away, but that’s when I felt bad.  That was the first time I had ever hugged someone wearing a turban and it was then, I was aware of my bias.  Seeing the turban made me think of September 11th and terrorism, because that’s all I’ve seen portrayed on the news.”

All students who participated experienced fear, anxiety or prejudice. As strangers approached for a free hug, students became aware of their apprehensions connected with certain groups of people, took note of how they felt and what they thought, and then reflected on why they experienced those effects. Students identified that most of their ingrained fears stemmed from ignorance about the stranger’s culture. Additionally, students mentioned that their prejudiced thoughts linked back to negative images they had seen on television news stories and movies. These unwarranted fears contributed to why students may have been divided from the strangers their whole life.

“I thought he might be a homeless guy,” another student recounted. “He got up and started to walk toward me.  My heart started to pound because I wasn’t sure what to expect.  Would he smell bad or say something inappropriate? Surprisingly, both answers were no.”

Free Hugs

This activity also required students to identify their own prejudices and make a choice: allow their fear to control their actions before denying the stranger’s hug, or decide to expand their cultural awareness by “embracing” the moment and experiencing a heightened sense of vulnerability and inclusiveness.

“As a visitor from Pakistan, this may have been the only hug I would ever receive my entire life from a stranger, especially a female stranger, since it is not allowed where I’m from,” a man who chose to accept a student’s hug said.

All students reported feeling excitement, joy, connection and/or accomplishment by the end of the activity.

“I’m going to save my Free Hugs sign and use it again, not for an assignment, but just because it made a difference in my life and many other lives,” one student said.

“Even after I had more than enough hugs to write about my experience, I wanted to stay out longer because it felt good,” another student said. “I could tell by strangers’ hugs, smiles and words of encouragement that others were feeling good too.”

By the end of the exercise, 700 – 800 hugs were exchanged around Reno.

This College of Education multicultural capstone course taught by Tara Madden-Dent is highly innovative and effective to incorporate empirical research with personal reflection. Students reported they had never taken a cultural studies course with such personal conviction and enlightenment as they studied similarities and differences between cultures. Tara Madden-Dent teaches Human Development & Family Studies and Education courses at the University of Nevada, Reno. Her educational blog can be found at https://taramaddendent.com/.

Original Article posted on UNR’s news website Nevada Today.

 

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Filed under Higher Education, International Education

My Interview with TeachingTraveling.com about HLSL Insitute

How fun is it to participate with Lillie Marshall (@WorldLillie) on www.TeachingTraveling.com?!!  It’s a blast!

As a featured guest, my interview discusses how I can teach from anywhere while expanding How Leaders Should Lead Institute. We discuss how HLSL Institute helps people from all around the world, how educators can become more culturally competent, and introduces cultural education.

Check out A Job Teaching International Students About American Culture to read the interview and share your thoughts.

As an international educator and University Instructor, I’m thrilled to be a part of the diverse global dialog about culture and education.

 HLSL Institute Featured Article

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Filed under Higher Education, International Education

What is Cultural Competence?

A student of mine shared a link to the State of Washington’s Superintendent of Public Instruction website during a discussion about cultural competence.
The website shared the following definition of what cultural competence is and what it is not.

“…cultural competence goes beyond memorizing a checklist of surface-level customs and cultural differences.
Cultural competence allows educators to ask questions about their practice in order to successfully teach students who come from different cultural backgrounds.

Developing skills in cultural competence is like learning a language, a sport or an instrument. The learner must learn, re-learn, continuously practice, and develop in an environment of constant change. Cultures and individuals are dynamic — they constantly adapt and evolve.

Cultural competence is:

•Knowing the community where the school is located.
•Understanding all people have a unique world view.
•Using curriculum that is respectful of and relevant to the cultures represented in its student body.
•Being alert to the ways that culture affects who we are.
•Placing the locus of responsibility on the professional and the institution.
•Examining systems, structures, policies and practices for their impact on all students and families.

Cultural competence is not:

•Good intentions.
•Cultural celebrations at designated times of the year, in designated ways.
•Kumbaya diversity.
•A list of stereotypes about what people from a particular cultural group do.
•Assumptions that all students from one culture operate in similar ways and have had similar experiences.
•The responsibility of children, their parents or the community.
•Color-blindness (treating everybody the same).
•Simple tolerance.”

As future educators and school administrators, we need to identify how intercultural and cross-cultural competence influences teacher preparation, student development, curriculum design, and educational policy.

“As educators, we want the best for students and seek ways to meet the needs of all learners in our classrooms. We sometimes find that this requires skills and knowledge far above and beyond the content area we are teaching…
Cultural competence provides a set of skills that professionals need in order to improve practice to serve all students and communicate effectively with their families. These skills enable the educator to build on the cultural and language qualities that young people bring to the classroom rather than viewing those qualities as deficits.

Cultural competence training asks educators to confront the stereotypes held both consciously and unconsciously about students. Bias affects the way that we perceive and teach students and has the potential to negatively affect student achievement.

Teachers who aspire to become more culturally competent can build relationships based on trust with students and their families, even though they experience the world in different ways. This is essential to closing academic achievement gaps and to fulfilling all students’ civil right to a quality education.”

My students are primarily future teachers and administrators. Read the comment section of “Cultural Studies & International Education” for a very interesting dialog about how they perceive the roll of multicultural, intercultural, and cross-cultural K12 education.  Other resources are introduced such as a great video: Why We Need Multicultural Education and a helpful webpage: Building Culturally Competent Organizations.

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Filed under Higher Education, International Education

Faculty Can Attract International Students & Faculty Using Social Business (In Nevada & Beyond)

Follow the link below for the PowerPoint Presentation: “Attracting International Students & Faculty via Social Business in Higher Education”

Social Business in Higher Education- IAIR 2013

Ppt Highlights

  • Social Business: Cyber marketing, networking, and publication via virtual platforms to promote a product or business.
  • Faculty can use the increasing traffic on social media sites to increase the attention to their research and institution.
  • Did you know that 70% of YouTube traffic comes from outside the U.S? Or that YouTube reaches more adults (ages: 18-34) than any cable network?
  • Consistent & transparent online  faculty personal branding can:

– Increase attention from students, faculty, donors, industry leaders, and others to faculty research, departments, & institutions

– Disseminate research faster and stimulate greater interest and collaboration in the field

– Increase professional development skills and make faculty more competitive in higher education markets

– Generate easier and faster communication as well as instructional resources

– Attract more international attention to faculty and their work 

As higher education becomes increasingly competitive, and the international student is sought after more by higher education institutions, faculty can help attract & recruit both in-state, out-of-state, and international students & faculty to their institution through social business strategies. Social business is cost effective and after its initial start-up, is easy to maintain.

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July 18, 2013 · 3:36 am

New Nevada Higher Education Funding Formula: Making International Students More of a Priority

fund form

There are two aspects of the new Nevada higher education funding formula that will contribute towards a stronger demand for international students.  The first involves how Nevada college and university revenue will be calculated.  The traditional formula was based on student enrollment (colleges received funding based on the number of students who enrolled in courses).  The new funding formula is based on student completion rates (colleges receive funding based on the number of students who pass their courses). This change means that colleges and universities only get paid if the students are successful and pass a class.

(old) Enrollment rates    —>    (new) weighted student course    +   completion rates  =  Pay for performance model

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This is a good change if Nevada’s colleges have high performing students who pass all their classes.  Unfortunately, research demonstrates that this is not always the case.  Out of seven public colleges and universities and a handful of private colleges in the state, in-state (resident) students only demonstrate approximately 50% graduation rates within 6 years; whereas, non-resident aliens (out-of-state/international) students demonstrate approximately 70% graduation rates.  This means that the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) will collect approximately 20% more revenue from international and out-of-state students.

The second aspect of the new NV higher education funding formula that contributes towards a stronger demand for international students includes how student tuition/fees are kept on campus.  You see, in-state (resident) students pay approximately $6,500 per year whereas; non-resident aliens (out-of-state/international) students pay approximately $20,000 per year.  Nevada higher education institutions will be able to keep more of their out-of-state student tuition/fees compared to the in-state student tuition/fees based on this new formula.

Remember, higher education is a business.  If international students bring in more out-of-state tuition/revenue and are more likely to pass their courses (hence, more money), colleges and universities will undoubtedly favor and invest in international student recruitment, retention, and graduation.  This is a significant change for Nevada since for many years institutions have under-appreciated the vast diversity and globalization benefits that international students contribute to campuses and communities.  Hopefully, the unintended consequences of this new funding formula will ultimately stimulate greater research, cross-cultural support services, and international partnerships in Nevada.

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Filed under Higher Education, International Education

Knock Knock…Who’s there? International Students and We Want Your Attention.

gradiStock_000020829404_Small

By 2025, more than 8 million students are projected to be studying abroad (outside their home country).  This increasing demand for international education presupposes a growing need for student support resources to accommodate a growing international student aggregate.  But as higher education systems struggle with state and federal disinvestment (funding and support), it will also struggle with providing necessary resources (staffing, space, funding, etc.) for student success.  In the midst of this academic conundrum, international students will seek what other options are available.  This is a problem for higher education since it already completes with public, private, online, for-profit and non-profit educational entities for quality international students.  The colleges and universities who can’t provide and support their current students won’t be able to attract/recruit new ones.

Did you know that international students have different needs than domestic/traditional students?  For example, the need for cross-cultural transition education directly impacts student performance.  Many colleges and universities don’t provide the cross-cultural support.  If it is provided, many services are often very minimal, provided long after the semester initiated, or are grant funded (which means the money can always be discontinued after the fixed contract).  This is truly unfortunate for the international student body.  Cultural differences between American college cultures and the norms of international students can influence academic success, social skills, psychological health, and professional development.

If students are not provided proper cross-cultural training before they arrive on American campuses and are not supported during post-induction cultural transitions, serious factors can derail their academic and professional goals (not to mention their overall wellness: psychological, emotional, financial, and physical wellbeing).

As higher education continues to feel the growing pains and pressures to enhance international student recruitment and retention, I believe there is a greater need to prioritize cross-cultural services.  If international students don’t experience a healthy transition, they are not as apt to succeed and pass their classes.

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Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Student Support Services

Image Source: http://ow.ly/fNAFh

Image Source: http://ow.ly/fNAFh

Twenty-first century higher education strives to prepare an educated and civilly responsible workforce, capable of succeeding in competitive, global markets. Globalization and higher education are interdependent systems benefiting from each other’s successes as well as impacted by each other’s forgone positive contributions. Globalization is not a trend, but a growing influence reshaping college campuses and employer demands. As technology, transportation, and communication evolve, international collaboration increases; thus, presupposing a greater need for educational systems to bridge diverse cultural gaps.

Globalization and technology trends presuppose the increased need for highly skilled college graduates with intercultural communication and adaptation skills. As international student enrollment increases, there will also be increasing pressures to develop effective international student support services and the evaluation of those services while competing with for-profit and nonprofit institutions. Greater linkage between higher education student support services and international student needs will foster communication and facilitate better transition into American college cultures; ultimately strengthening international student successes.

Cross-cultural awareness + sensitivity + competencies = intercultural adaptation

Cross-cultural: researching and understanding the similarities and differences between two cultures.
Intercultural: The interaction between two cultures.

The preliminary findings from my dissertation pilot study, “International Student Perception of a Pre-Departure Cross-cultural Competency Preparation: A Phenomenological Study”, found two main themes. The first was that inbound international students need specific and unique student support services (compared to traditional students) that directly impact their academic success. The primary need was for better English speaking (not writing) services. The second was that cultural preparation strategies for international students are needed to enhance student transition into the American higher education system. Specifically, socialization or “sticky campus” strategies that increase a balanced student engagement lifestyle were addressed.

The international student perspective demonstrated that an earlier intercultural intervention could improve student cross-cultural competencies and thus, intercultural adaptation into American college cultures and their academic success. These findings should encourage college and university administrators to more intentionally and accurately address international student needs, prescribe more effective campus support services, and consider developing pre-departure cultural preparation services to better serve international students before they arrive on campus.

If you have experienced effective cultural preparation strategies or would like to recommend helpful educational strategies, please share them in the comments section below.  Thank you for visiting taramaddendent.com.

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Filed under Higher Education, Leadership

Student Discipline

Watch this video about school law, specifically student discipline, and participate in a discussion about policy and law.

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Filed under Higher Education

We’re here to Help Students Succeed

The first week of our fall semester is over and students are now feeling the hefty weight of their course workloads.  What happens now?  How can students work through the new overwhelming stresses?

It all starts with knowledge: let students know about the wide array of campus resources available to help cope, guide, and manage their academic challenges. The following resources are just a few of the most common campus services for students:

Writing centers– An excellent campus resource that usually offers free writing tutors.  These specialists help students outline writing assignments, edit papers, structure references, and correctly report in-text citation to avoid unintentional plagiarism.

Libraries– Besides the obvious free book rental, libraries are now a modern knowledge utopia.  Most provide free computer labs, free technology rentals (cameras, microphones, projectors, USB’s, tripods, movies, etc), free study rooms, discounted printing options, and research/presentation support.  Many campus libraries also offer free specialized student workshops about a wide array of topics including, “how to navigate WebCampus”, “how to Skype”, “how to create a PowerPoint”, or “How to use Endnote”.

Student Counseling– Most college students pay a psychiatric counseling fee as part of their student tuition but don’t realize it.  Campus counselors are professionals that help reduce anxiety and stress through specialized and confidential discussion. They also teach coping and time management skills. If it’s a service already paid for, why not use it?

Career Centers– While many students complete their coursework, they are also searching for work after graduation.  Building a professional resume, reference page, and cover letters takes time; not to mention the skill to present material in a competitive and professional manner. Student career centers are convenient and free campus resources that help maximize employment efforts in less time and are proofread by trained specialists.

Child Day Care– Many higher institutions provide free child day care for the mommy or daddy college student.  Space is usually limited, so get on a waiting list now. This student support resource can greatly help encourage a consistent attendance rate by not having to worry about a babysitter.

Health Centers– Another excellent student resource that help address and resolve stress and other wellness issues that distract students from completing homework on time. This is another service whose cost is most likely incorporated into student tuition; so why not use it?

Campus Gyms– There are numerous physical, emotional, mental, social, and other wellness benefits of utilizing campus gyms.  Students will experience a boost in self-esteem and health by keeping endorphins high and stress low. Membership fees are usually lower than regular private gyms if not free for students. Suggest that students try working out and having fun in campus recreation activities.

Professors & Administrators– We are here for students.  If they are struggling, have them stop by a professor’s office hours, pop into a Student Services office, or contact the Dean of their major.  We are here to promote their success.  If we can’t directly help the student, we will know the person who can and will make sure the two meet.

 

Students: RELAX and know you’re in good hands. College is fun and you’re going to do GREAT!

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Filed under Higher Education, Leadership

College = Employment

Groans and whining; that’s all I heard while listening to my previous student describe her experience at a student job fair:

“It was the same old, same old.  I pitched the same monologue over and over while shaking the hands of local employers in hopes that I land a job after graduation.  Why do I have to work so hard for only a few potential jobs?  It seems like someone should have invented a more efficient way for students to land a cool job by now… isn’t this the 21st century?”

Looking at her with amusement, I shook my head in agreement before replying, “Check out Presentfull.com”.

You see, until now, colleges and universities have used traditional, localized methods to introduce students to the workforce.  It has been a difficult task that requires significant time, staffing, and institutional resources.  Many postsecondary institutions cannot afford student employment resources which leave students to experiment with employment challenges alone.  Fortunately, higher education can now use social media to achieve our instiutional mission faster and more efficiently.

Presentfull.com offers a more effective approach to increase student employment rates.  If enrolled in college, a student can create a free profile to market themselves and apply for internships, part-time, and full-time jobs.  Presentfull’s international student employment website has officially launched this month in the United States. I suggest that students, higher education, and the business sector explore its usefulness.

Think about it…no more door-to-door, hope to get an interview, inefficient employment plans.  You now have the freedom to brand yourself as a qualified professional from the comfort of your own home.   Presentfull.com is a new resource for college students to introduce themselves, develop and promote their resume, network with local and international companies, and apply for jobs all on one website.  Did I mention it’s free?!

How can your business benefit from having a free profile on Presentfull.com?  How can college students benefit from marketing their skills and applying to jobs all around the world? How can professors use Presentfull to increase student engagement and learning? And lastly, how can higher education benefit from using Presentfull’s resources?

  • Business Benefits- Open access to qualified college students interested in internships, part-time jobs, and full-time careers at your company.
  • College Student Benefits- Increase professional network of potential employers and business partners, apply for internships, part-time jobs, and full-time careers on a local level and international level, and engage with other students and college professors.
  • Professor Benefits- Familiarize yourself with students, create a free class discussion forum, introduce your students to open job opportunities that correspond with your course topic, and invite business professionals to speak to your class as guest experts.
  • Higher Education Benefits- Free and streamlined student career planning: resume/CV development, Video Resume development, Cover Letter/Letter of Interest development, application station, mentor and network center.

Check out Presentfull.com for yourself by creating a free profile. Let me know what you think.

Also, congratulations to all 2012 graduating college students and incoming fall senior college students. I hope the Presentfull.com resource helps you get the job/internship that makes you very happy and successful. Good luck. -Tara

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Filed under Higher Education, Social Business

4 Twitter Tips for Professors

1.)    Use Twitter to get to know your students, have them get to know each other, get to know previous students, campus clubs and resources, and department faculty early in the semester.

(Twitter can contribute toward greater student engagement, interest, and utilization of campus resources that compliment your teaching objectives)

2.)    Have on-going, real-time discussions about current events related to your learning objectives.  

(Unleash student creativity, interest in your topic, Twitter autonomy, and cyber collaboration; it contributes to student success in greater capacities than traditional instruction can provide)

3.)    Introduce your students to other leading authors, speakers, and researchers in your industry while staying up-to-date with the most current articles, research studies, seminars, webinars, current events, etc. that relate to the syllabus.

(Twitter combines “what you know” with “who you know”; this not only helps them learn the course content faster but also sets them up for future networking and professional opportunities)

4.)    Create a Hashtab and TweetChat forum for your class to discuss topics during conferences, seminars, or webinars.

(Class discussion during a meeting, online webinar, guest speaker, conference, etc., can stimulate greater student collaboration, engagement/interest in the topic, and lead to further investigative cyber research. TweetChat forums presuppose internet connection; therefore, students can check the references mentioned in the conference, research counter theories or opinions, collect supporting documents, etc. while still in the TweetChat discussion.  This leads to extraordinary learning)

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Online Higher Education: A brief article review

No Financial Aid, No Problem. For-Profit University Sets $199-a-Month Tuition for Online Courses, is a Chronical of Higher Education article introducing a revolutionary higher education model about for-profit online education.  I analyzed the article using political, structural, human resource, and symbolic organizational frames recommended by Bolman and Deal (2008).  The article addressed the benefits, obstacles, and controversy surrounding online education.  Even though the article stated that its online student enrollment has increased 30 to 40 percent each year, what are some other confounding variables that affect students and higher education?  Furthermore, how do employers perceive an online degree and will that perception help or hinder an online graduate’s probability of being hired?  The increasingly popular online education system provides a self-paced model creating flexible student schedules and a pay-as-you-go payment plan.

The article mentioned that online, for-profit universities are also changing the role of faculty.  Instead of a professor, faculty members are “Course Mentors”.  Their primary responsibility is to teach with little or no advisement requirements.  Furthermore, “Course Mentors” have no grading responsibilities.  “Graders” are outsourced staff with the sole responsibility to assess and record student grades (having no instruction responsibilities).  Like the online education revolution, almost every major organizational change is accompanied by new policy, new problems, and new solutions.  The question is, will educational leaders resist or embrace the changes?  Information Technology (IT) and Social Business (SB) will continue to synergize with higher education.  It will be the innovators and educational leaders who study and restructure the use of IT and SB to produce our most desired outcomes.

We will witness many intended and unintended consequences resulting from for-profit, online education.  These changes will transform traditional scholar, instructor, administrator, and employer roles.  As we redesign the college experience to fit a 21 century culture, let’s reevaluate our mission and policies from a structural, political, symbolic, and human resource organizational frame.  This strategy will help us plan and implement new initiatives contributing to the most efficient, effective, and streamlined hybrid higher education system.

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New Study: Mentoring Impacts More Than Graduation Rates

“Mentoring” can be defined as the structured, intentional and sustainable relationship between a person with more experience and knowledge (mentor) and a person with less experience and knowledge (mentee). Research has shown that mentored relationships can encourage professional and personal success, and that pre-college programs that include mentoring can more effectively help students transition from high school to college. However, a recent study conducted by the University of Nevada, Reno College of Education suggests that the act of mentoring can contribute just as many positive outcomes for mentors as it does for mentees.

The study looked at college student mentors of sixth through twelfth grade students in the University’s Dean’s Future Scholars program. The program is an outreach, research-based mentoring approach to increase high school graduation rates and college enrollment for first-generation, low-income students. In the study, the college student mentors identified themes of how mentoring affected their own lives. The college mentors stated that being a mentor enabled them to reflect on their own behaviors as a student and make better decisions leading to their own success. As a result, the mentors believed it had inspired greater motivation for achievement, improved their own study and work habits, increased their accountability to faculty, and caused them to reevaluate their own professional goals. The lesson learned: being a mentor is more than supporting the goals of another. It is an opportunity to reflect on one’s own behavior, strategies and goals. Mentoring is a win-win situation for both those aspiring to attend college in the future, as well as for current college students who serve as their mentors.

The sixth through twelfth grader students who participated in the Dean’s Future Scholars Program since its foundation in 2000, have been given the knowledge, skills, direction and support to make the decisions necessary to graduate from high school and complete college. The program recruits students during their sixth-grade year from Washoe County School District Title I schools and mentors them through high school and college. The program has established a homegrown, sustainable educational model resulting in a 90 percent and 86 percent high school graduation rate of participants the last two years, respectively. This is significant when compared to Nevada’s high school graduation rate of 56 percent and the national average graduation rate of 74 percent.

The program requires students to meet with a college student mentor regularly to review grades, establish goals, make sure the necessary steps are taken to fulfill high school graduation requirements, and plan for college. The program also hosts a summer program to provide high school math courses, early college credit and an introduction to college life. It provides tutoring, examination preparation, community service projects, campus internships, college application assistance and financial aid. The program is largely funded by private donations and grants, along with campus resources.

The mentoring component is key to any academic or professional program. Aspiring college students should consider inviting a trustworthy, knowledgeable and experienced mentor to provide guidance in their lives, and trustworthy, knowledgeable and experienced professionals should consider mentoring students. To watch a short interview with Bob Edgington, director of the Dean’s Future Scholars Program, visit http://ow.ly/adKb5. Or, for more information on the program, contact Bob Edgington at 775-784-4237 or bobdfs@unr.edu.

 

Co-authors: Tara Madden-Dent & Dr. Patricia Miltenberger

Tara Madden-Dent is a Nevada Law Instructor and PhD Candidate in higher education administration at the University of Nevada, Reno College of Education; http://taramaddendent.com  http://twitter.com/#!/DrTaraMDent   http://www.linkedin.com/in/taramaddendent

Dr. Patricia Miltenberger is professor emeritus of higher education administration at the University of Nevada, Reno College of Education. http://wolfweb.unr.edu/homepage/pmilten/  https://twitter.com/#!/coyotepat   http://www.linkedin.com/pub/pat-miltenberger/20/719/38a

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What Makes a Successful Expatriate or Student Traveling Abroad?

As I research and develop new strategies to increase USAC student, US expatriate, and transpatriate success rates, I realize that job satisfaction and mission achievement are dependent on two things: the caliber of early training/preparation and the clear expectations of individual performance.  These are the essential elements that students and employees must have in order to accomplish their learning or working objectives abroad.

Regardless of the reason for international travel, certain levels of preparation and study are required for optimal success overseas.  In the last few months, through interviewing transnational companies and researching study abroad programs, I have found that intensive international training models are lacking.  A successful trip overseas should include pre-travel assessments, continuous evaluation while abroad, and post-travel assessment in addition to supplemental cross-cultural sensitivity and customs training.  As digital citizens, communication is made easy and bimonthly updates should be protocol for every student and employee.  Dependable liaisons in both parent-country and host-country should be provided as well. Commitments to host-country relationships should be made far before the student or employee leaves the US and should be sustained while living in the host-country.  Practicing the language and using local resources while participating in internships or volunteer positions can help speed through transition stages.  Also, membership in community clubs, churches, and organizations should be considered to fast-track assimilation, strengthen relationships, maximize opportunities, and take advantage of time spent overseas.  A clear understanding of host-country cultural dimensions should prepare the traveler for the new region’s values and customs.

Did you know that the US is known for having the highest expatriate failure rates?  Research shows that this is largely due to family member cross-cultural inadaptability (not able to transition beyond culture shock stages).  Often, US expatriates travel overseas with their spouse and children but companies underestimate their influence on employee performance.  Companies should recognize the importance to thoroughly prepare family members as well as the employee.  An unhappy family can lead to an unhappy expatriate; thus a lower return rate on company investments.  Personalized training models that provide adaptation shortcuts will significantly help reduce periods of frustration and homesickness.  Mentors and SykpePals (like pen-pals) will also encourage a faster transition even before the student or employee leaves America.

As we continue to notice the impact of world staffing for global operations, we witness the development of global citizens or third country nationals (TCNs).  The amount of international accomplishment and job satisfaction presupposes the amount of time and money invested into overseas preparation.  Increase your success rate while studying or working in a foreign country by being honest with what you are expected to achieve and what you must do in order to achieve it. Visualize yourself in the new living environment and make local mentor connections to guide your transition.  Finally, dedicate sufficient time preparing for the language, cultural, and logistical differences abroad. For tricks, tips, and training, email me at tara@taramaddendent.com.  We can discuss the newest model of cross-cultural adaptation I am currently researching, designing, and testing to increase student, US expatriates, and transpatriate success rates.

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College Student Development

The most common theme I hear from my students is, “I’m not sure what I want to do”.  These college students are spending countless hours and money attending college and passing classes without really knowing who they are, who they want to be, or establishing professional goals. It’s almost as if they choose college majors based on everything but personal conviction and professional passion.  Why choose a major that you don’t love and can’t see yourself wanting to know more about the subject every day?  I know some students who have picked a degree based because it had the least number of required course credits for graduation. I wonder if that’s because some students are not sure what they want.  How important is it for a student to learn about them self, their ethics, their values, priorities, and specific goals and how would those insights impact college student success more than merely going through the motions until graduation?

Managing Oneself by Peter Drucker is a handy, quick read to stimulate self discovery and goal setting for all developing individuals; especially for college students.  The book is part of the Harvard Business Review Classic Series and was intended to shape best practices and leadership skills in managers. I believe that the concepts are significantly important for college students as well.  The concepts and lessons generate personal identification of values, ethics, and goals; everything that could help students better understand who they are now and who they want to become.

Each of the following sections are partnered with simple rational and multifaceted support guiding the reader to better understand their value system, their skills, develop a healthy professional motivation, and leads to setting professional goals:

What are my Strengths?

How do I perform?

Am I a reader or a listener?

How do I learn?

What are my values?

Where do I belong?

What should I contribute?

Responsibility for relationships

Cutting down the time students flip from one major to another will help them to graduate faster.  By narrowing their focus and aligning their passion with their studies will help them to enjoy their college experience and gain more from their research.  Managing Oneself introduces the important and critical qualities that young leaders should spend time on in order to be the most efficient in their own pursuits for success. If we’re asking our college graduates to make a choice and pick a career, let’s ensure that they’re equipped with the skills, self-identity, motivation, and personal conviction that contributes towards their graduation and professional success.

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There’s No Stopping It: Social Media in Higher Education

As we know, higher education is slow to change.  Faculty and administrator resistance is enabled by the extensive matrix of institutional paperwork, procedures, hierarchies, and traditions. Those familiar with both business and higher education know that most colleges and universities lack critical application of technology and social media.  Think about how much more effective higher education could be if faculty, administration, departments, curriculum, and outreach used social media and social business to achieve their objectives.

The thing is, our digital culture won’t wait for higher education to discuss, rationalize, and slowly implement technology into their services.  Social media has already partnered with our students who use it all day, every day.  Yes, this includes during our class time (I know my students are surfing Facebook, LinkedIn, Klout, Twitter, Pinterest, Tumbler, Hootsuite, etc).  But now, how can I redesign my instructional methods to harness the power of social media to achieve my teaching objectives?  How can faculty and administrators use social media to increase student success and organizational change?  Furthermore, how can administration use social media to increase faculty and staff effectiveness, streamline employment practices, and increase job placement for our graduates?  In the near future, I will discuss these important questions through a blog series called Presentfull starting on Monday, June 18th, 2012.  This new company is helping to revolutionize higher education and more readily streamline a P16 environment.  Administrators, faculty, and staff will use this new social media application to find it directly contributes to institutional mission achievement.

Stay tuned, we live in an exciting time and I can’t wait until I can share it with you.

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Social Business in Higher Education: Increasing Faculty Competitiveness

The following Screenr introduces a newer concept in higher education: Social Business can increase faculty competitiveness to both support research and job security.

For further information regarding my Social Network Equation mentioned in the Screenr presentation, please visit: Social Network Equation.

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21st Century Conferences: Increasing Faculty Competitiveness

[This video blog interviews Dr. Joseph Bonnici, College of Business Professor at Central Connecticut State University and Dr. MeHee Hyun, Professor of Liberal Studies at Antioch University.  The discussion introduces multiple discipline conferences and how faculty can benefit from them to increase their competitiveness and effectiveness.]

Before jumping right into the multi-disciplinary discussion, let’s take a look at what inspired me to research the issue.  I have recently established a university Publish or Perish club (PPC) to generate a culture of research and student publication.  Student members benefit from and prefer using collaborative models to co-author their publications.  Because the club is open to all university students including diverse backgrounds, grade levels, and research interests, students are reporting an increase in their writing quality and creativity.  The PPC’s multidimensional matrix of complimentary academic interests has inspired robust research through cross-discipline and cross-department communication.  Partnerships amongst the colleges of Business, Education, Engineering, Liberal Arts, Medicine, Student Affairs, the Diversity Center, and the Recreation center are just a few examples.  Students range from incoming freshmen to graduating PhD students and have shared that they benefit from working together.

This successful premise of cross-discipline collaborative student networking is transferable into faculty networks.  (Do you see where I’m heading?)  Where does faculty go to share their research and learn about new research?  Traditionally, they attend single-discipline academic conferences; but increasing trends of multiple academic disciplines have recreated higher education conferences.  For example, today I attended the 2012: International Conference for Academic Disciplines in Las Vegas, NV.  It is hosted by the International Journal of Arts and Sciences at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.  The journal believes that the conference’s enriched culture of international perspective and academic frames provide faculty with a more robust conference experience.  Today’s multiple discipline conference and networking structure has inspired many new ideas.  For example, Dr. Donald Noone, Division of Business Professor at Caldwell College, introduced the benefits of Transformative Learning Protocols.  Even though the idea came from a business presentation, I can use the concept by customizing the model to fit my specific instructional objectives.

Complimentary research and expertise beyond a single discipline can contribute to a more dynamic research perspective.  Like the PPC, multiple discipline partnerships can offer faculty diverse research perspective that applies to their professional interest.  Isn’t this concept of blending and pairing complimentary disciplines what institutions like Harvard have done while creating their newer PhD programs? (Discipline-Plus Model)

Single-discipline conferences are beneficial by providing narrow, specific, and in-depth discussions on a related topic.  Multi-discipline conferences reflect a matrix of complimentary research interests and scholars with a common publishing goal.  These inclusive teams reach a wider audience through unbridled creative innovation.  National and international 21st century conferences help encourage co-author publication, increase educational leadership networks amongst a variety of disciplines, promotes a global culture of collaboration, and increases faculty recognition; thus increasing faculty’s competitive and professional value.  Make connections outside of your current circle and expand your scope of expertise by attending a multiple discipline conference.  Let me know how it helps you become more competitive in higher education.

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Blogging 101 for Educational Leaders

[The attached video is an interview with Dr. Bret Simmons, a College of Business Associate Professor of Management at the University of Nevada, Reno.  His extensive research and experience in management, leadership, and social business contributes significant merit to our discussion about faculty or administrators developing and managing a blog.]

Lately, higher education faculty and administrators, perplexed about the blogging culture, have approached me with specific questions regarding how to start a blog.  Confusion about blogging formats, tone, purpose, length, and how often to post are blogging barriers for many academics.  This blog will respond to their concerns in hopes of helping to reduce initial blogging intimidation or anxiety.

Social media will continue being a significant influence in post-secondary education instruction and communication. Did you know that there are more than 160 million public blogs and over 180,000 blogs created every day?  Faculty and administrators have the duty to adapt, master, and lead educational instruction and research dissemination through technology.  Blogging is one strategy to accomplish these goals.  Blogging is a way to network with leading scholars, analyze current studies, and develop co-collaborative publications.  It also is an effective way to test theories and receive feedback on article topics.  Blogging should not hinder a faculty or administrator’s ability to lead but instead be effective means of increasing student learning and research development.  By introducing the usefulness and inclusivity of blogging to faculty and administrators, misconceptions and hesitations of blogging in academia will dissolve.

Remember to relax and have fun; it’s a blog not an APA 6th edition research paper.  Blogging is an opportunity to have real-time, relevant conversations that contribute original knowledge within your industry.  Educators should be at least familiar with blogging as a means to research and converse with leading professionals, increase professional competitiveness, increase college recognition, and increase instructional effectiveness.  So blog responsibly, discern reliable and valid internet resources from extraneous materials, and be known for relevant, valid, and reliable content.

A few free blog websites where you may choose to start your own include WordPress, Blogger, LiveJournal, Blog.com, & Weebly.

Blog examples include: Bret Simmons, Greg Mankiw, Seth Godin, Gerald Lucas, Craig Monk, Bob Sutton, Tom Peters, LawProfessorBlogs, and Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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I wish…

A young woman from Florida named Elise wrote me last week and asked, “Because I don’t have an overwhelming passion for only one thing and I don’t have a personal brand, how can I become a more valued and important professional in my workplace?”

Most likely, there are many opinions and recommendations for Elise about this subject but I will respond by answering, “listen for I WISH statements”.  “I WISH” statements are another way of saying, “here is a need and it is an opportunity for someone to create a solution”. Purpose and value are often determined by the ability to satisfy a need and “I WISH” statements can identify those needs.

Examples include:
-“I WISH my child had a mentor”. Solution: Dean’s Future Scholars

-“I WISH teachers had it better, I’d become one”. Solution: To Teach or Not to Teach

-“I WISH I knew more about blogs and how blogging can help me become a better writer” Solution: 6 Ways Blogging helps writers

-“I WISH I was more nationally recognized in Higher Education”. Solution: The Social Network Equation  Social Business in Higher Education: Increasing Faculty Competitiveness  Connecting the dots: Increasing competitiveness and leadership

-“I WISH we could study abroad”. Solution: USAC Increases Student Competitiveness

-“I WISH I didn’t have to drive all the way to Carson City in order to attend a Nevada Legislature meeting” Solution: Knowing the Politics behind your Success

-“I WISH I had more publications to put on my curriculum vitae”. Solution: Cross-disciplinary student initiated collaboration  Publish or Perish

“I WISH my son or daughter could do something extra to be more successful in college” Solution: Sticky Campus

“I WISH I had someone to talk to about becoming more competitive” Dr Tara Madden-Dent

These I WISH statements came from people in my life.  I responded to them by addressing the need and creating a solution or recommendation.  If I can’t solve their I WISH statement, I introduce them to other resources that can.  Either way, I contributing to others and creating progress within my industry.

Listen for I WISH statements in your life. These are moments when you can be of value and satisfy a need; thus becoming more productive and essential in the workplace.  Being proactive and taking initiative reflects creative ambition and selflessness: two very respected and rare qualities in today’s workforce.  If you can’t resolve a need by yourself, search for other resources or work in partnership with other professionals. You’re ability to contribute to society, create change, and see your efforts manifest into solutions will inspire your passion through feelings of being useful and productive.  Creating solutions for I WISH statements can add professional value to yourself and your business.

Please let me know Elise after you address an I WISH statement in the workplace and how it impacted your role as a professional. Thanks for the email; I wish you great success.

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Knowing the Politics behind your Success

“Knowing the Politics behind your Success” is a PowerPoint tutorial that provides instructional steps to 1) conveniently access your Nevada Legislature’s meetings during a LIVE INTERNET BROADCAST and 2) easily contact your Legislative Representative and include them into your professional network.

Your Legislatures are voting on legal issues that directly impact your current and future professional success.  Become politically savvy to predict and prepare for future trends, needs, and business opportunities in your society and workplace.

This Screenr PowerPoint tutorial gives an example of how current legislation is impacting Higher Education for those working or studying at a college or university.

Try the two strategies presented in “Knowing the Politics behind your Success” and share your thoughts and/or experiences to this blog.  I appreciate the feedback about how you increase your professional competitiveness through political awareness.

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