Category Archives: International Education

International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Mexico)

I’d like to thank my student Kourtney for her excellent final project: International Student Interview. I would also like to thank Amanda for sharing her story with us. Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Mexico. I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.
Many of Amanda’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students. The following key points are from the video:
•Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language, making friends, and transportation. She coped with language challenges by practicing with family. She has made American friends through her cousin. Until Amanda gets a drivers license, she relies on family to get around town.
•Being separated from family can be very challenging but she uses Skype and email to communicate often.
•She likes the U.S. culture and food the most.
•Amanda recommends that international students and travelers “Be proactive” by learning about where they’re moving to and to get involved with extracurricular activities. She joined a church and Cross-fit (gym exercise class).
•Having a family member living in the U.S. helped Amanda’s adjustment.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, the Congo, Japan, El Salvador. Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do. Thanks.
Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S. Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

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International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (El Salvador)

I’d like to thank my student Sarah Bellows for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Alex for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from El Salvador.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Alex’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language, making friends, and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with family & Truckee Meadows Community College classes.   She has made American friends through classes and work.
  • Being separated from family can be very challenging but she visits home and uses Facebook, Skype, and email to communicate often.
  • She likes the U.S. culture and educational system.  She considers the U.S. as her home.
  • Alex recommends that international students and travelers make the move to America by following all legal processes and paperwork.
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases professional development, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

 

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, the Congo, and Japan.  Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

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International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Japan)

I’d like to thank my student Emily Thibault for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Akane Hagiya for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Japan.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Akane’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language, making friends, and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with friends/teammates/family & taking English classes.  She had made more friends by getting involved with sports, classmates, and roommates.  Experiencing American cultural traditions (Thanksgiving dinner) with host country nationals was helpful.  Being separated from family can be very challenging but she used Skype and email to stay in touch.
  • Akane shares that weekly dinners with other international students and with American teachers and families are very helpful.
  • She likes the U.S. culture and educational system.
  • Akane recommends that that international students make new American friends and join their groups to practice English.  Getting out of your comfort zone will help you fully learn about the American culture.
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases professional development, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, and the Congo.  Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

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International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Congo & Gabon, South Africa)

I’d like to thank my student Kayla Williams for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Mireille (Mimi) for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Congo, Africa.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Mimi’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with friends/teammates/family & taking English classes. She had made more friends by getting involved with sports.  Being separated from family can be very challenging but she used social media and phone calls to stay in touch.  (Skype).
  • When Mimi came to the U.S., she knew people here which is helpful.
  • She likes the U.S. culture and freedom of speech.
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases professional development, athletic opportunities, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews with Jiao Jiao from Beijing, China, Nikki from Vietnam, or Chavisa from Bangkok, Thailand. Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

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International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Bangkok, Thailand)

I’d like to thank my student Dana Moreno for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Chavisa for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Bangkok, Thailand.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Chavisa’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with friends/teammates in addition to watching movies, listening to music, writing, and getting involved with activities to use the English language often.  She had made more friends by getting involved with sports.  Being separated from family can be very challenging but she used social media to stay in touch.   (Skype and Facebook).
  • When Chavisa came to the U.S., she knew people here which is helpful.  She also had experience in Australia which helped prepare her for life in the U.S.
  • She likes the U.S. culture, educational system, and diversity of people here
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases professional development, confidence, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews with Jiao Jiao from Beijing, China or Nikki from Vietnam. Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

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International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Vietnam)

I’d like to thank my student Shirin Abboud for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank  Nhi (Nikki) Vuong for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Vietnam.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Nikki’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language, making friends, and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with friends/teammates in addition to watching movies, writing, asking questions, and getting involved with activities to use the English language often.  She made friends by being more outgoing and getting involved with sports.  Being separated from family can be very challenging but Nikki uses social media to stay in touch.
  • Nikki came to the U.S. with her immediate family so knowing someone here is helpful but it means that there are more cross-cultural complexities that come with more people transitioning into the U.S. culture.
  • She likes the U.S. culture/friendly people/diversity
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases confidence, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the three weeks. Check out last week’s interview with Jiao Jiao from Beijing, China. Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

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International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Beijing, China)

I’d like to thank my student Amanda Santos for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank  Mengjiao Mi “Jiao Jiao”, for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Beijing, China.  I hope that this helps students  coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Jiao Jiao’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Jiao Jiao just graduated from the University of Nevada, Reno this month! Congrats Jiao Jiao!
  • Jiao Jiao is an accomplished UNR athlete (impressive dedication for her studies and sports commitments)
  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language, time management, and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with friends and teammates, asking questions, and getting involved with activities to use the English language often.  She coped with balancing academic and athletic responsibilities by structuring time management skills.  Being separated from friends and family can be very challenging but she used social media to connect and stay in touch.   Time differences were an issue but staying up late or getting up early to chat was worth it.
  • Jiao Jiao came to the U.S. without knowing anyone here. (That takes courage)
  • She likes the U.S. food (except raw,cold vegetables) & U.S. culture/friendly people (but was shocked about dating culture).
  • Jiao Jiao is planning on applying to UNR’s Public Health Masters program in 2014
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases confidence, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the next month. Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

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New Nevada Higher Education Funding Formula: Making International Students More of a Priority

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There are two aspects of the new Nevada higher education funding formula that will contribute towards a stronger demand for international students.  The first involves how Nevada college and university revenue will be calculated.  The traditional formula was based on student enrollment (colleges received funding based on the number of students who enrolled in courses).  The new funding formula is based on student completion rates (colleges receive funding based on the number of students who pass their courses). This change means that colleges and universities only get paid if the students are successful and pass a class.

(old) Enrollment rates    —>    (new) weighted student course    +   completion rates  =  Pay for performance model

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This is a good change if Nevada’s colleges have high performing students who pass all their classes.  Unfortunately, research demonstrates that this is not always the case.  Out of seven public colleges and universities and a handful of private colleges in the state, in-state (resident) students only demonstrate approximately 50% graduation rates within 6 years; whereas, non-resident aliens (out-of-state/international) students demonstrate approximately 70% graduation rates.  This means that the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) will collect approximately 20% more revenue from international and out-of-state students.

The second aspect of the new NV higher education funding formula that contributes towards a stronger demand for international students includes how student tuition/fees are kept on campus.  You see, in-state (resident) students pay approximately $6,500 per year whereas; non-resident aliens (out-of-state/international) students pay approximately $20,000 per year.  Nevada higher education institutions will be able to keep more of their out-of-state student tuition/fees compared to the in-state student tuition/fees based on this new formula.

Remember, higher education is a business.  If international students bring in more out-of-state tuition/revenue and are more likely to pass their courses (hence, more money), colleges and universities will undoubtedly favor and invest in international student recruitment, retention, and graduation.  This is a significant change for Nevada since for many years institutions have under-appreciated the vast diversity and globalization benefits that international students contribute to campuses and communities.  Hopefully, the unintended consequences of this new funding formula will ultimately stimulate greater research, cross-cultural support services, and international partnerships in Nevada.

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Knock Knock…Who’s there? International Students and We Want Your Attention.

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By 2025, more than 8 million students are projected to be studying abroad (outside their home country).  This increasing demand for international education presupposes a growing need for student support resources to accommodate a growing international student aggregate.  But as higher education systems struggle with state and federal disinvestment (funding and support), it will also struggle with providing necessary resources (staffing, space, funding, etc.) for student success.  In the midst of this academic conundrum, international students will seek what other options are available.  This is a problem for higher education since it already completes with public, private, online, for-profit and non-profit educational entities for quality international students.  The colleges and universities who can’t provide and support their current students won’t be able to attract/recruit new ones.

Did you know that international students have different needs than domestic/traditional students?  For example, the need for cross-cultural transition education directly impacts student performance.  Many colleges and universities don’t provide the cross-cultural support.  If it is provided, many services are often very minimal, provided long after the semester initiated, or are grant funded (which means the money can always be discontinued after the fixed contract).  This is truly unfortunate for the international student body.  Cultural differences between American college cultures and the norms of international students can influence academic success, social skills, psychological health, and professional development.

If students are not provided proper cross-cultural training before they arrive on American campuses and are not supported during post-induction cultural transitions, serious factors can derail their academic and professional goals (not to mention their overall wellness: psychological, emotional, financial, and physical wellbeing).

As higher education continues to feel the growing pains and pressures to enhance international student recruitment and retention, I believe there is a greater need to prioritize cross-cultural services.  If international students don’t experience a healthy transition, they are not as apt to succeed and pass their classes.

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Thank to my UNR student, Alyce for her wonderful final project interviewing Young Park. The transition into a new culture can be very challenging. Young introduces us to his cross-cultural experience.

 

 

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