Tag Archives: University of Nevada

Why Am I Teaching in Seoul, Shanghai, & Beijing? Read My Newest Publication “Preparing East Asian Undergraduates for the Cultural Challenges of Study in the U.S.”

Helping educate prospective students before they travel across the world to relocate in an unfamiliar culture with  little language skills is the most rewarding opportunity I have had thus far.  As demonstrated by research, the more cultural knowledge and experience a student has prior to study abroad, the more successful they will be with their academics, social life, communication, health, safety, and professional development in a new culture.

 

My newest publication, “Preparing East Asian Undergraduates for the Cultural Challenges of Study in the U.S.” is a condensed paper sharing how international students perceive U.S. cultural knowledge in regards to their preparation, transition, and adjustment during their first semester of U.S. study.  Ironically, although all participants wished they had been offered more formal lessons about U.S. culture prior to leaving their home country, not one had received or even heard about organized cultural training for study abroad!  YIKES!

 

THUS, for 5 1/2 weeks, my three objectives on the 2014 International Education Tour (Seoul, Shanghai, Beijing) is to:

1. Teach pre-departure U.S. college student success skills (U.S. culture, study skills, networking skills, language skills, and professional development skills) to students interested in U.S. study abroad.

2. Teach college student success strategies to students interested in improving their academic, social, language, and professional skills for NEVADA colleges and universities.

3. Apply my pre-departure and post-arrival relocation and adjustment curriculum to my own (first-time) stay in Asia to feel and experience a glimpse of what my international students endure before, during, and immediately after relocating to a culturally rough (different) environment with little (to no) language skills, resources, or local contacts for support.

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION IS AWESOME!!!!

With the right preparation and guidance, cultural transition and relocation can be MUCH EASIER.  Saving time, money, stress, and energy can produce GREATER OUTCOMES while reducing negative culture shock symptoms. Contact me to learn more about this subject or post a comment/question below.  Thanks for stopping by my blog.

Na-jung-e bwae-yo!   나중에 봬요!

Tara Madden-Dent, Ph.D. is an international education consultation, teacher, and speaker.  She is available at:

          Twitter (@DrTaraMDent)     Facebook       HLSL Institute        LinkedIn       Academia.edu

Leave a comment

Filed under Higher Education, HLSL Institute, International Education, U.S. Culture

University of Nevada Students Learned U.S. Culture & Student Success Skills

UNR New  Int'l Student Workshop (Fall, 2014)

UNR New Int’l Student Workshop (Fall, 2014)

After two days teaching at the University of Nevada, new international student survey data indicates that workshop attendees gained cultural knowledge about the northern Nevada culture and skills to navigate the UNR campus.  Furthermore, these students (new to the U.S.) reported an increase in ability to use local campus and community resources for study, socialization and networking, communication skills, professional development, transportation and living needs.  The skills-based workshops were designed to develop specific competencies to bridge cultural gaps and encourage student success through state-depended learning activities. 

Pic V picpic III

Prior to this workshop, almost all new international students reported having no prior U.S. cultural training for living or studying in U.S. systems.  This is why I’m even MORE EXCITED to teach pre-departure U.S. cultural lessons on my 2014 International Education Tour in Seoul, South Korea, Shanghai, China, and Beijing, China this fall!  In addition to the upcoming tour’s instructional workshops and presentations, I will be visiting schools, volunteering as a language and culture teacher, networking with administrators and local businesses, representing Nevada institutions at study abroad fairs, and participating in interviews and making guest speaker appearances.  The tour’s research data will provide insight into how almost six weeks of pre-departure educational events will help prepare international students for U.S. study, how new international partnerships can be developed, and how Nevada college and university outreach, recruitment, and retention efforts may be strengthened. pic IV

 

If all cultural workshops and seminars on the tour are half as fun and effective as the University of Nevada’s were, I’m in for an excitingly wonderful adventure teaching abroad.  One and half weeks to go. Seoul, here I come!  pic II

 

Dr. Tara Madden-Dent teaches U.S. cultural workshops and consults for a variety of international educational programs. Contact HLSL Institute to request more information regarding cultural workshops, program evaluations, international representation, or guest speaker invitations.   

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

I’m a Ph.D. and LOVING IT! Watch my dissertation presentation in under 3 minutes.

It feels AMAZING to have walked across the stage at the University of Nevada’s graduation commencement to officially recognize my Ph.D. in Educational Leadership specializing in international education.  To top things off, I’ve received second place for a fun university competition called the “3 Minute Dissertation Presentation”.  My short (< 3 minute) video summarizes my dissertation.  My full +200 page paper is published through the ProQuest Dissertation Database.  To learn more about my research without reading the entire document, you can always post a comment on this blog and we’ll discuss it.

 

I look forward to applying my research as I teach international people pursuing life, work, and studies in the United States.  If you are interested in learning more about how I applying my findings into practice, visit HLSL Institute.  Not only am I working in the United States, but I am available for international speaking, teaching, and training assignments. Contact me and we’ll schedule your next cross-cultural preparation workshop or seminar to prepare students, employees, or family members for successful transition and adjustment into the U.S.

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Higher Education, International Education, Leadership

Educational Leadership: Dale Erquiaga, NV Superintendent of Public Instruction

Dale Erquiaga, the Superintendent of Public Instruction of Nevada’s Department of Education joined my students and me at the University of Nevada yesterday.  I teach Educational Leadership in Modern Society and Educational School Law courses.  Dale generously contributed his time to help support my students’ (future NV teachers and administrators) professional development by responding to their questions (posted below).  His responses to their questions are found in the comment section.

1. Please share your thoughts about the NV teacher & administrator evaluations. (Please include some short-term and long-term benefits, challenges, concerns.)

 

2. Please share about the Common Core State Standards Initiative. (Please include how it will be implemented and used.)

 

3. Please share your thoughts about the new NV higher education funding formula. (Please include some short-term and long-term benefits, challenges, concerns.

 

4. What are some recommendations for future teachers/administrators entering into public NV K12 positions?

 

5. How can college students get more involved with legislative decisions impacting Nevada education?

19 Comments

Filed under Higher Education

Video Interview: Greek International Student

Thank to my UNR student, Ariel for her wonderful final project interviewing Stelios Papafloratos. The transition into a new culture can be very challenging. Stelios introduces us to his cross-cultural experience.

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Ph.D. Student Talks About Transition into Reno, NV

Filiz Gozenman, a Ph.D. student from Turkey shares about her transitional experience into Reno, NV.

3 short videos:

 

 

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

My Interview with TeachingTraveling.com about HLSL Insitute

How fun is it to participate with Lillie Marshall (@WorldLillie) on www.TeachingTraveling.com?!!  It’s a blast!

As a featured guest, my interview discusses how I can teach from anywhere while expanding How Leaders Should Lead Institute. We discuss how HLSL Institute helps people from all around the world, how educators can become more culturally competent, and introduces cultural education.

Check out A Job Teaching International Students About American Culture to read the interview and share your thoughts.

As an international educator and University Instructor, I’m thrilled to be a part of the diverse global dialog about culture and education.

 HLSL Institute Featured Article

1 Comment

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

What is Cultural Competence?

A student of mine shared a link to the State of Washington’s Superintendent of Public Instruction website during a discussion about cultural competence.
The website shared the following definition of what cultural competence is and what it is not.

“…cultural competence goes beyond memorizing a checklist of surface-level customs and cultural differences.
Cultural competence allows educators to ask questions about their practice in order to successfully teach students who come from different cultural backgrounds.

Developing skills in cultural competence is like learning a language, a sport or an instrument. The learner must learn, re-learn, continuously practice, and develop in an environment of constant change. Cultures and individuals are dynamic — they constantly adapt and evolve.

Cultural competence is:

•Knowing the community where the school is located.
•Understanding all people have a unique world view.
•Using curriculum that is respectful of and relevant to the cultures represented in its student body.
•Being alert to the ways that culture affects who we are.
•Placing the locus of responsibility on the professional and the institution.
•Examining systems, structures, policies and practices for their impact on all students and families.

Cultural competence is not:

•Good intentions.
•Cultural celebrations at designated times of the year, in designated ways.
•Kumbaya diversity.
•A list of stereotypes about what people from a particular cultural group do.
•Assumptions that all students from one culture operate in similar ways and have had similar experiences.
•The responsibility of children, their parents or the community.
•Color-blindness (treating everybody the same).
•Simple tolerance.”

As future educators and school administrators, we need to identify how intercultural and cross-cultural competence influences teacher preparation, student development, curriculum design, and educational policy.

“As educators, we want the best for students and seek ways to meet the needs of all learners in our classrooms. We sometimes find that this requires skills and knowledge far above and beyond the content area we are teaching…
Cultural competence provides a set of skills that professionals need in order to improve practice to serve all students and communicate effectively with their families. These skills enable the educator to build on the cultural and language qualities that young people bring to the classroom rather than viewing those qualities as deficits.

Cultural competence training asks educators to confront the stereotypes held both consciously and unconsciously about students. Bias affects the way that we perceive and teach students and has the potential to negatively affect student achievement.

Teachers who aspire to become more culturally competent can build relationships based on trust with students and their families, even though they experience the world in different ways. This is essential to closing academic achievement gaps and to fulfilling all students’ civil right to a quality education.”

My students are primarily future teachers and administrators. Read the comment section of “Cultural Studies & International Education” for a very interesting dialog about how they perceive the roll of multicultural, intercultural, and cross-cultural K12 education.  Other resources are introduced such as a great video: Why We Need Multicultural Education and a helpful webpage: Building Culturally Competent Organizations.

3 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Bangkok, Thailand)

I’d like to thank my student Dana Moreno for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Chavisa for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Bangkok, Thailand.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Chavisa’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with friends/teammates in addition to watching movies, listening to music, writing, and getting involved with activities to use the English language often.  She had made more friends by getting involved with sports.  Being separated from family can be very challenging but she used social media to stay in touch.   (Skype and Facebook).
  • When Chavisa came to the U.S., she knew people here which is helpful.  She also had experience in Australia which helped prepare her for life in the U.S.
  • She likes the U.S. culture, educational system, and diversity of people here
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases professional development, confidence, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews with Jiao Jiao from Beijing, China or Nikki from Vietnam. Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Vietnam)

I’d like to thank my student Shirin Abboud for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank  Nhi (Nikki) Vuong for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Vietnam.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Nikki’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language, making friends, and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with friends/teammates in addition to watching movies, writing, asking questions, and getting involved with activities to use the English language often.  She made friends by being more outgoing and getting involved with sports.  Being separated from family can be very challenging but Nikki uses social media to stay in touch.
  • Nikki came to the U.S. with her immediate family so knowing someone here is helpful but it means that there are more cross-cultural complexities that come with more people transitioning into the U.S. culture.
  • She likes the U.S. culture/friendly people/diversity
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases confidence, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the three weeks. Check out last week’s interview with Jiao Jiao from Beijing, China. Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Beijing, China)

I’d like to thank my student Amanda Santos for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank  Mengjiao Mi “Jiao Jiao”, for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Beijing, China.  I hope that this helps students  coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Jiao Jiao’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Jiao Jiao just graduated from the University of Nevada, Reno this month! Congrats Jiao Jiao!
  • Jiao Jiao is an accomplished UNR athlete (impressive dedication for her studies and sports commitments)
  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language, time management, and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with friends and teammates, asking questions, and getting involved with activities to use the English language often.  She coped with balancing academic and athletic responsibilities by structuring time management skills.  Being separated from friends and family can be very challenging but she used social media to connect and stay in touch.   Time differences were an issue but staying up late or getting up early to chat was worth it.
  • Jiao Jiao came to the U.S. without knowing anyone here. (That takes courage)
  • She likes the U.S. food (except raw,cold vegetables) & U.S. culture/friendly people (but was shocked about dating culture).
  • Jiao Jiao is planning on applying to UNR’s Public Health Masters program in 2014
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases confidence, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the next month. Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

New Study: Mentoring Impacts More Than Graduation Rates

“Mentoring” can be defined as the structured, intentional and sustainable relationship between a person with more experience and knowledge (mentor) and a person with less experience and knowledge (mentee). Research has shown that mentored relationships can encourage professional and personal success, and that pre-college programs that include mentoring can more effectively help students transition from high school to college. However, a recent study conducted by the University of Nevada, Reno College of Education suggests that the act of mentoring can contribute just as many positive outcomes for mentors as it does for mentees.

The study looked at college student mentors of sixth through twelfth grade students in the University’s Dean’s Future Scholars program. The program is an outreach, research-based mentoring approach to increase high school graduation rates and college enrollment for first-generation, low-income students. In the study, the college student mentors identified themes of how mentoring affected their own lives. The college mentors stated that being a mentor enabled them to reflect on their own behaviors as a student and make better decisions leading to their own success. As a result, the mentors believed it had inspired greater motivation for achievement, improved their own study and work habits, increased their accountability to faculty, and caused them to reevaluate their own professional goals. The lesson learned: being a mentor is more than supporting the goals of another. It is an opportunity to reflect on one’s own behavior, strategies and goals. Mentoring is a win-win situation for both those aspiring to attend college in the future, as well as for current college students who serve as their mentors.

The sixth through twelfth grader students who participated in the Dean’s Future Scholars Program since its foundation in 2000, have been given the knowledge, skills, direction and support to make the decisions necessary to graduate from high school and complete college. The program recruits students during their sixth-grade year from Washoe County School District Title I schools and mentors them through high school and college. The program has established a homegrown, sustainable educational model resulting in a 90 percent and 86 percent high school graduation rate of participants the last two years, respectively. This is significant when compared to Nevada’s high school graduation rate of 56 percent and the national average graduation rate of 74 percent.

The program requires students to meet with a college student mentor regularly to review grades, establish goals, make sure the necessary steps are taken to fulfill high school graduation requirements, and plan for college. The program also hosts a summer program to provide high school math courses, early college credit and an introduction to college life. It provides tutoring, examination preparation, community service projects, campus internships, college application assistance and financial aid. The program is largely funded by private donations and grants, along with campus resources.

The mentoring component is key to any academic or professional program. Aspiring college students should consider inviting a trustworthy, knowledgeable and experienced mentor to provide guidance in their lives, and trustworthy, knowledgeable and experienced professionals should consider mentoring students. To watch a short interview with Bob Edgington, director of the Dean’s Future Scholars Program, visit http://ow.ly/adKb5. Or, for more information on the program, contact Bob Edgington at 775-784-4237 or bobdfs@unr.edu.

 

Co-authors: Tara Madden-Dent & Dr. Patricia Miltenberger

Tara Madden-Dent is a Nevada Law Instructor and PhD Candidate in higher education administration at the University of Nevada, Reno College of Education; http://taramaddendent.com  http://twitter.com/#!/DrTaraMDent   http://www.linkedin.com/in/taramaddendent

Dr. Patricia Miltenberger is professor emeritus of higher education administration at the University of Nevada, Reno College of Education. http://wolfweb.unr.edu/homepage/pmilten/  https://twitter.com/#!/coyotepat   http://www.linkedin.com/pub/pat-miltenberger/20/719/38a

Leave a comment

Filed under Higher Education, Leadership