Tag Archives: HLSL Institute

WEBINAR: The Best Way To Prepare for USA Study

FREE Webinar Training + U.S. University Class Discount

With Dr. Tara Madden-Dent

Wednesday: February 24

  • 6:00PM/1800 Indonesia and Thailand

  • 7:00PM/1900 China and Taiwan

  • 8:00PM/2000 Japan and South Korea

    Don’t wait until you’re in the USA to begin class.             
    International students don’t always get the classes they want and it can delay their progress towards graduation.

Join the Free webinar to learn how:

  • To enroll in your first U.S. university class “U.S. Academics and Culture” and finish it online at home!

  • To learn western study skills, how to earn better grades, how to make U.S. friends, how to network and other professional skills for the USA.

  • To earn 3 course credits on a transferable U.S. transcript!
  • To earn a Letter of Recommendation (in English) by a U.S. Professor!
  • To earn a Certificate of Completion (In English) for their resume!
Be prepared for success in the USA by
Registering for the Free Webinar at:

https://usaconline.leadpages.co/usa-university-webinar/

____________________________________________________

Visit www.usac.online for more information about the class or contact matthew@hlslinstitute.com.

college friends using tablet computerWatch from Mac, PC, Tablet, or Mobile Phone.

HLSL INSTITUTE, USA

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Study Online and Earn University Credit BEFORE Applying to School

What is “U.S. Academics & Culture” online class?

THE OLDEST, MOST ADVANCED UNIVERSITY READINESS CLASS IN THE WORLD, TAUGHT ONLINE, WORTH EARN 3 UNIVERSITY CREDITS!

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Students who pass the class earn:

  • U.S. strategies to succeed in western universities
  • Western communication and socialization skills
  • Three university credits on a U.S. transcript
  • Letter of Recommendation from a U.S. Professor (in English) to strengthen university applications and job resumes
  • Certificate of Competition to strengthen university applications and job resumes
  • Preferred acceptance into an elite 4-year private U.S. college

There’s no application and no English score required.  Visit http://www.hlslinstitute.com to enroll today!

Who can enroll?

  • International students 14 years old, or older
  • Students who can complete the class in English (No TOEFL required, but recommended score of 60 and higher)
  • Students who want to learn success skills for U.S. study
  • Students who want to become more competitive for school and job applications

When to enroll?

  • Simple answer, at anytime
  • A new class starts each first Monday of every month
    • The 2016 class schedule: Jan 18th, Feb 1st, March 7th, April 4th, May 2nd, July 5th, Aug 1st, Sept 6th, Oct 3rd, Nov 7th, and Dec 5th

How to enroll?

  • Click this “Enroll Now” link or the button below

How long does it take to finish the class? 

  • Students complete the class on their own pace. Some students take a couple weeks, some students take several.  All students must complete the class within 12 weeks.

How does this cost compare with the cost of taking 3 credits in the United States?

Cost Comparison

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Looking for a scholarship?  Partial scholarships are provided on a case by case basis.  Please click here to email our team.

Quotes

This on-line course will provide the keys to success for studies in the United States.  From how to effectively apply to your school of choice to strategies of how to integrate on campus when  you first arrive, Tara and her team will guide you through the entire process.Susie Askew, Director at the University of Nevada, Reno  Office of International Students and Scholars

Knowing culture before coming to U.S. decreases anxiety for adjusting to new country. Just for my culture, I think it’s really mandatory, before.” — Minjae L., Seoul, South Korea

This study is helpful for me. It helped mentally prepare me studying and to meeting new friends.” — Wei C., Shanghai, China

Knowing culture gave me confidence to talk, get involved, and participate.” — Wayne L., Beijing, China

 

 

FREE WEBINAR  – Wednesday, January 10, 2016

Register for the Webinar that Works Best for Your Time Zone:

WEBINAR 1:

Time: (Japan 1900 / 7 pm JST;    South Korea 1900 / 7 pm KST;    China 1800 / 6 pm CST)

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9134209712079716610
Webinar ID: 101-847-563    United States: +1 (415) 930-5321    Access Code: 337-877-485

 

WEBINAR 2:

Time: (Colombia and Peru 1800 / 6 pm COT;     USA  6 pm EST & 3 pm PST)

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5194110893457792258

Webinar ID: 113-033-235  United States: +1 (914) 614-3221    Access Code: 239-072-648

 

WEBINAR 3:

Time: (Western Europe and Central Africa  1800 / 6 pm CET,   UTC/GMT +1 hour)

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5892876921188446210

Webinar ID: 112-670-603  United States: +1 (562) 247-8422    Access Code: 166-492-316

 

WEBINAR 4:

Time: Kuwait and Saudi Arabia 1800 / 6 pm AST;      Brazil 2000 / 8 pm BRST

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/187050389286685954

Webinar ID: 111-060-659  United States: +1 (415) 930-5321   Access Code: 267-977-595

HLSL Institute

Our Mission

We improve the quality of life for international students by teaching U.S. academics and culture.  International students can more easily navigate U.S. university classrooms, campuses, and social networks to achieve academic, social, and professional goals.

Our Services

Since 2010, our team has been on the forefront of pre-departure research and instruction to support students pursuing study abroad.  We teach pre-departure and post-arrival classesthat help international students manage cultural and academic challenges associated with adjustment in new schools.

Through curriculum design, international teaching and presentations, online webinars, research, and publications, we provide international students with early, effective, and practical education so they live healthier, more successful, and happier lives.

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WEBINAR: Three Tips for Succeeding in U.S. Universities (Jan 10)

 Strategies to Succeed in the U.S.A!

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Are you preparing for undergraduate study in the United States? 

Learn three strategies proven to increase student success at U.S. Universities in FREE WEBINAR on JANUARY 10, 2016

 

You will learn:

  1. How to Start U.S. University Early and Why U.S. Universities Want You to

  2. How to Make the Most out of Your Time in the USA and Graduate from Universities Faster

  3. How to Get Ready for Internships and Jobs as a Student

 

Webinar Times – Wednesday, January 10, 2016

Register for the Webinar that Works Best for Your Time Zone:

WEBINAR 1:

Time: (Japan 1900 / 7 pm JST;    South Korea 1900 / 7 pm KST;    China 1800 / 6 pm CST)

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9134209712079716610
Webinar ID: 101-847-563    United States: +1 (415) 930-5321    Access Code: 337-877-485

WEBINAR 2:

Time: (Colombia and Peru 1800 / 6 pm COT;     USA  6 pm EST & 3 pm PST)

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5194110893457792258

Webinar ID: 113-033-235  United States: +1 (914) 614-3221    Access Code: 239-072-648

WEBINAR 3:

Time: (Western Europe and Central Africa  1800 / 6 pm CET,   UTC/GMT +1 hour)

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5892876921188446210

Webinar ID: 112-670-603  United States: +1 (562) 247-8422    Access Code: 166-492-316

WEBINAR 4:

Time: Kuwait and Saudi Arabia 1800 / 6 pm AST;      Brazil 1300 / 1 pm BRST

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/187050389286685954

Webinar ID: 111-060-659  United States: +1 (415) 930-5321   Access Code: 267-977-595

Space is limited so register today!  Looking forward to meeting you on Sunday!

 

Helpful Resources: International Student video testimonies about U.S. study:

Many international students struggle with understanding and adjusting to U.S. academics and culture after they arrive for school.  It can negatively impact their grades, health, communication and socialization, professional development, and home country relationships (Video Example: Research).

1 (China), 2 (Graduate Student; China), 3 (London), 4 (China), 5 (Senegal) , 6 (Greece), 7 (Mexico), 8 (Japan), 9 (Congo, South Africa), 10 (Bangkok, Thailand), 11 (Vietnam), 12 (China), 13 (France), 14 (Vietnam), 15 (Turkey). See more at http://www.taramaddendent.com.

 

ABOUT HLSL INSTITUTE

HLSL Institute provides cultural training and preparation for students and scholars.

MISSION: We improve the quality of life for international students by teaching U.S. academics and culture.  By taking our class, international students are more able to navigate U.S. college and university classrooms, campuses, and social networks to achieve academic, social, and professional goals.  Through cultural education, we’re connecting the world, one person at a time.

HLSL Institute teaches the world’s first U.S. university preparation class called, “U.S. Academics & Culture

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FREE WEBINAR: International Students Earn 3 College Credits on U.S. College Transcript (September 15)

Your Opportunity to Start U.S. College Online, Prepare for U.S. Study, & Graduate Faster!

Register at http://www.thestudyabroadportal.com/hlsl-institute/earn-u-s-college-credits-online-and-graduate-sooner?w2palt=2

Are you a high school or college student preparing to study in the United States? 

If yes, you may qualify for the world’s first U.S. college preparation course: “U.S. Academics & Culture”!  Join us on Tuesday, September 15 to learn how this online, 3 college credit class can help you learn U.S. success skills before their first semester.

There’s no need to apply and wait for U.S. college acceptance… take our class and start today! Pass the class and earn a U.S. college transcript accepted at accredited U.S. colleges and universities!

Students who pass U.S. Academics & Culturewill earn:

  • Greater knowledge of U.S. success skills for study, communication, work, and socialization
  • U.S. college transcript with 3 course credits
  • Letter of recommendation from Ph.D. Professor for college applications and resumes
  • Certificate of competition for college applications and resumes
  • Acceptance into an elite 4-year private U.S. college (for high school seniors and older)
  • Entry into select scholarships (high school seniors and older)

Moreover, this course SAVES YOU MONEY!

cost comparison

Class space is limited due to high interest from students from all over the world.  Learn more on Tuesday’s webinar about the world’s first U.S. college prep course worth U.S. college credits!

During this webinar you will learn about:

  • Great benefits of passing this online, self-paced “U.S. Academics and Culture” Course
  • How to successfully enroll and pass the online course
  • Reasons why U.S. universities want you to enroll and pass this course
  • Reasons why global employers want you to enroll and pass this course
  • Ways you can help other students prepare for U.S. study and earn money

The Need for Early Preparation for U.S. Study

Many international students struggle with understanding and adjusting to U.S. academics and culture after they arrive for school.  It can negatively impact their grades, health, communication and socialization, professional development, and home country relationships(Video Example: Research).

AVOID the hardships by learning key transition and success strategies from the comfort of your home country. Our faculty (Ph.D. and MBA Professors) are the best in the world and specialize in the cross-cultural skills you need.

This on-line course will provide the keys to success for studies in the United States.  From how to effectively apply to your school of choice to strategies of how to integrate on campus when  you first arrive, Tara and her team will guide you through the entire process.Susie Askew, Director at the University of Nevada, Reno  Office of International Students and Scholars

Knowing culture before coming to U.S. decreases anxiety for adjusting to new country. Just for my culture, I think it’s really mandatory, before.” — Minjae L., Seoul, South Korea

This study is helpful for me. It helped mentally prepare me studying and to meeting new friends.” — Wei C., Shanghai, China

Knowing culture gave me confidence to talk, get involved, and participate.” — Wayne L., Beijing, China

International Student video testimonies about U.S. study and transitions:

1 (China), 2 (Graduate Student; China), 3 (London), 4 (China), 5 (Senegal) , 6 (Greece), 7 (Mexico), 8 (Japan), 9 (Congo, South Africa), 10 (Bangkok, Thailand), 11 (Vietnam), 12 (China), 13 (France), 14 (Vietnam), 15 (Turkey). See more at http://www.taramaddendent.com.

HLSL Institute is an international education service providing pre-departure cultural training and preparation for international students and scholars.

MISSION: We improve the quality of life for international students by teaching U.S. academics and culture.  By taking our class, international students are more able to navigate U.S. college and university classrooms, campuses, and social networks to achieve academic, social, and professional goals.  Through cultural education, we’re connecting the world, one person at a time.

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Webinar: Discussing a Research Study about Study Abroad and Pre-departure Preparation for Internatioanl Students

Pre-departure Preparation of East Asian Students for U.S. Academic & Cultural Challenges

In our twenty-first century’s IT learning environment, how can we prepare international students for U.S. study before they arrive in the States?

This is the topic I will be discussing during Wednesday’s webinar entitled Developing Cultural Competence at the College and University Level hosted by the Berlitz Training Management Corporation on June 17 (7:00 am PST).

webinar
By helping international students develop better expectations of what they will experience during their first year at a U.S. campus, we can help them better manage cross-cultural adjustment challenges so they function as healthy and happy students whose English and social skills continuously develop as they succeed academically and  professionally.

Join the webinar and learn about how online cultural training is applied in U.S. universities.  Hope to see you Wednesday online.  ~ Tara

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Preparing East Asian Undergraduates for the Cultural Challenges of U.S. Study

One of my publications, “Preparing East Asian Undergraduates for the Cultural Challenges of Study in the U.S.”, is a policy white paper discussing how a pre-departure cultural preparation treatment influenced a group of international students’ experiences before, during, and after their first semester at a western U.S. research university.  This topic is key to 21st century international education and I see it becoming the next wave of expected coursework for international students.

In this research study, although all participants wished they had taken a formal course about U.S. culture and academic systems while they lived in their home country, not one participant had received or even heard about organized cultural training or U.S. college preparation classes for study abroad before they arrived in the U.S.!  This is significant since research indicates that cultural knowledge, realistic expectations, and adjustment management skills speed up cross-cultural adaptation, increases student success, and fosters student engagement (increases student retention rates).

Dr. Dent Team DI found that eastern Asian students are eager to learn about the U.S. culture and academic systems prior to leaving home for U.S. study during my 2014 International Education Tour in South Korea and China last fall.  Many parents, schools, businesses, and government organizations have asked me to return this year… so I am!

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In addition to teaching eastern Asian students about U.S. culture and academic systems, this year’s 2015 International Education tour will also share the research findings from my forthcoming publication entitled, “International Student Support Services Index” (ISSSI).

ISSSI organizes internationally related services by school and ranks institutions in relationship to other U.S. campuses. The index is grounded on five key research indicators that make up cross-cultural adjustment best practices to foster international (inbound and outbound) student success from pre-departure to repatriation/re-entry stages. 

Teaching U.S. College Preparation Skills in Seoul, South Korea, 2014

ISSSI’s research findings are made available through a free internationally circulated online publication used by domestic and international students, parents, study abroad organizations/placement services, recruiters, government organizations, secondary schools, and post-secondary international programs to better understand the U.S. international climate and individual campus internationalization efforts.

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For more information, contact:

www.hlslinstitute.org or see www.taramaddendent.com

HLSL Institute provides educational services to international students, expatriates, international programs, and government organizations that bridge cultural gaps and connect the world, one person at a time. 

HLSLinstituteLOGO

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University of Nevada Students Learned U.S. Culture & Student Success Skills

UNR New  Int'l Student Workshop (Fall, 2014)

UNR New Int’l Student Workshop (Fall, 2014)

After two days teaching at the University of Nevada, new international student survey data indicates that workshop attendees gained cultural knowledge about the northern Nevada culture and skills to navigate the UNR campus.  Furthermore, these students (new to the U.S.) reported an increase in ability to use local campus and community resources for study, socialization and networking, communication skills, professional development, transportation and living needs.  The skills-based workshops were designed to develop specific competencies to bridge cultural gaps and encourage student success through state-depended learning activities. 

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Prior to this workshop, almost all new international students reported having no prior U.S. cultural training for living or studying in U.S. systems.  This is why I’m even MORE EXCITED to teach pre-departure U.S. cultural lessons on my 2014 International Education Tour in Seoul, South Korea, Shanghai, China, and Beijing, China this fall!  In addition to the upcoming tour’s instructional workshops and presentations, I will be visiting schools, volunteering as a language and culture teacher, networking with administrators and local businesses, representing Nevada institutions at study abroad fairs, and participating in interviews and making guest speaker appearances.  The tour’s research data will provide insight into how almost six weeks of pre-departure educational events will help prepare international students for U.S. study, how new international partnerships can be developed, and how Nevada college and university outreach, recruitment, and retention efforts may be strengthened. pic IV

 

If all cultural workshops and seminars on the tour are half as fun and effective as the University of Nevada’s were, I’m in for an excitingly wonderful adventure teaching abroad.  One and half weeks to go. Seoul, here I come!  pic II

 

Dr. Tara Madden-Dent teaches U.S. cultural workshops and consults for a variety of international educational programs. Contact HLSL Institute to request more information regarding cultural workshops, program evaluations, international representation, or guest speaker invitations.   

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Shanghai Ocean University Workshop at Sierra Nevada College

The excitement for this fall’s 2014 International Education Tour has now intensified after I taught international students from Shanghai Ocean University at Sierra Nevada College.  These students are visiting Nevada, USA for three weeks to get a feel for the U.S. educational system and learn professional development skills.

合影 Group Shot

For two hours, I had the pleasure of teaching these students for their first U.S. college class.  The lesson focused on entrepreneurial strategies to brand themselves or a product using social media platforms (AKA: Social Business).  The cross-cultural instruction and learning was accomplished through student surveys, reflections, lecture, demonstration, and activities.  Although language was an initial concern, the international students surpassed all expectation and showcased amazing talent to adapt to the U.S. learning style and apply their new knowledge in small group activities.  It was a lot of fun!

Dr. Dent Team D Dr.Dent Team Work

As an international speaker, I’ve developed curriculum for Eastern Asian students to learn cultural knowledge and skills so they can adjust faster during their transition into the U.S. culture and succeed in U.S. classrooms.  I look forward to traveling to China this fall (after a 16 day stop in South Korea) to teach U.S. college success skills and cultural competencies.  I invite other Shanghai and Beijing schools to contact me via Twitter (@DrTaraMDent) or in the comment section below to collaborate while I’m visiting abroad.
Here is one example of an upcoming U.S. College Student Success seminar held in Seoul, South Korean on Sept. 15:

Study in the U.S.A.

Study in the U.S.A.

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2014 International Education Tour in Seoul & Beijing: August – October

gradiStock_000020829404_SmallStudent: “What’s up Doc? Have any plans now that your dissertation is finished?” 

Me:  “I’m teaching my research in Korea and China.  My participants supported me and now I will support them.” 

Many people are surprised that I am not pursuing a traditional tenure-track career and instead, doing something completely foreign… literally foreign.  I’m teaching my research overseas on a 2014 International Education Tour in Seoul, South Korea and Beijing, China.  By partnering with Eastern Asian schools, colleges, and universities, I’m offering seminars about U.S. college success skills and cultural competencies to prepare students for United States studies.

 “There’s plenty of intelligence in the world, but the courage to do things differently is in short supply.” ~Marily Vos Savant

Typically U.S. colleges teach international students about U.S. culture and academic systems during the first week of school.  It’s often difficult learning during this time since students are already overwhelmed with moving into a new apartment, finding transportation, completing course placement tests, and buying textbooks while feeling jet lagged, knowing little English, and being alone in a foreign county.  The coolest part of teaching across the world will be seeing Korean and Chinese students learn how to succeed in the U.S. BEFORE they leave their homes.

My 2014 international education tour will help Korean and Chinese students prepare for life and studies the U.S. and thus, adjust to the academic and community culture faster.  These students will gain the knowledge, skills, and confidence to fully receive a quality, safe, and fun U.S. college experience.  Participants will be better prepared to earn higher grades, meet new U.S. friends, network with faculty, develop English skills, and avoid unnecessary acculturation stresses during their initial transition.

The tour’s theme is the “10 Best Strategies to Adjust and Succeed in the United States”.  For example, one of my seminars will be hosted at the prestigious Sookmyung Women’s University located in Seoul, South Korea.  I’m thrilled to collaborate with the Asia Institute and the HLSL Institute to teach 100 students in a three hour seminar consisting of traditional lecture, common U.S. classroom activities, guest speakers, group work, student and faculty videos, and an interactive workbook.  Together, we will provide these students with the elite preparation (knowledge and skills) to become excellent students in the U.S.

Study in the U.S.A.

Study in the U.S.A.

“미국대학에적응하고성공하기위한 10가지전략”

이세미나는학생들이미국대학에서또는다른교육기관에서공부할때미국의문화로적응하고, 건강, 안전, 성적, 전문적기술, 영어능력등을향상시키는것을준비하도록도와줍니다.

학생들은연구조사, 시범설명, 강의, 활동, 인터액티브워크북(Interactive Workbook), 초청연사, 학생, 학생경험담, 질의응답의순서로세미나를접하게됩니다.

성공적인유학을위해대단히중요하고유용한시간이될것입니다.

Visit www.studyusaseminar.eventbrite.com to enroll in the Seoul seminar on September 15, 2014 6-9 pm.

Schools or agencies in Beijing, China and Seoul, South Korea are invited to contact Dr. Tara Madden-Dent about collaborating during the 2014 tour and future tours (i.e. school visits, lectures, and seminars, etc). 

“Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. ~Ralph Waldo Emerson.

 

 

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Happyschools.com Featured “My Work, My Life Series” with Dr. Madden-Dent

Cross Cultural Competence is More Important Than Ever with Dr.Tara Madden-Dent

After Raghuram Sukumar, founder of happyschools.com, and I discussed international student preparation and the importance of cultural competency in today’s competitive global economy, we began an introductory interview.   I describe my work, life career, and motivational tips below so that readers may better understand why I serve in my educational capacity and how I plan to use my research-driven instructional pedagogies around the world to prepare international students for successful U.S. studies.  Thank you Raghuram for your dedicated and valuable work in our increasingly popular field.  I look forward to working with you to help international students become healthier, happier, and more successful in the U.S.

 

tara madden dent

Dr. Tara Madden-Dent

Personal

  • Name – Tara Madden-Dent
  • Occupation – President & International Speaker at HLSL Institute (How Leaders Should Lead Institute)
  • Life Purpose – To teach my research and knowledge with others so they may have a higher quality of life in the United States.
  • Location – Lake Tahoe, Nevada, USA
  • Best Place Visited – Lake Tahoe, Nevada (That’s why I choose to live here)
  • What kind of books do you read? — Culture, travel, spiritual, entrepreneur, and language books
  • Your Blog – www.taramaddendent.com

 

Career

What is your 1 Year Goal?

I will offer my classes and workbooks to those studying, working, and living in the United States as I teach on my “2014 International Education Tour” in China and South Korea this August, September, and October.

 

What is your 2 Year Goal?

I will travel to India in 2015 to teach workshops to prepare those planning to study, work, and live in the U.S. so they can learn the “10 most effective cultural strategies to transition and adjust in U.S. colleges, universities, and work environments”.

 

What is your 5 Year Goal?

Expand my educational services into other countries to help as many people as possible around the world prepare for study, work, or life abroad.
What do you like most about your work today?

The clients (i.e. students, expatriates, their families). They are wonderful people who enrich my life and make me a better person. We become life-long friends.

 

What do you hate the most about your work today?

The hurtful stories I hear from new international clients (i.e. students, expatriates, their families) who don’t know how to get help and suffer from intense culture shock. I got my Ph.D. to stop those stories.

 

What is your dream job?

My current job. Teaching about successful relocation strategies to achieve academic, professional, and personal goals in the U.S. is the most rewarding job I could have since I see the positive benefits in my students’ lives.
What is your dream salary?
Enough money to support annual travel so I can learn about other cultures. It’s easier to combine work and play by teaching around the world. An example of this is in the featured online article.

Motivation

How do you stay motivated?

I thank God for the blessings and people in my life. Even when life is difficult, there is always good in the world and when I appreciate and acknowledge those positive blessings, I feel joy.  The joy turns to hope, and hope turns into strength, and the strength allows me to continue sharing my unique values to others.

 

What is the Best advice you have ever received?

The best advice came in the form of a question, “Why are you alive and what is your contribution to the world?” I knew then, I would contribute love through education.

When would you say you are successful in life?

I am successful when I see others applying my research and teachings to their lives or when they tell me they feel happier, healthier, and more successful because of me. That’s when I feel successful.

 

Any other suggestion, tips for HSB readers?

Regardless of language, color, gender, or nationality, one universal energy connects us. Let’s learn from each other and create better connections through education.

 

Most Memorable moments in your life.

The most memorable moment in my life is the day I got married in Rome to my amazing husband who also has an unquenchable thirst for travel and learning.

Cross Cultural Competence

Cultural competence can be understood as: An evolving capacity to interact and communicate with others having different cultural backgrounds built on foundations of cultural awareness, sensitivity, knowledge, and skills.

A person’s cultural competence determines their ability to navigate within a new culture.

Cultural competence is a set of skills needed for effective communication and collaboration amongst people from various backgrounds. It is essential to closing  academic achievement gaps, creating quality education systems, being competitive  in the 21st   century job market, creating sustainable environments and global allies.

The good news is, cultural competencies can be learned. Culturally trained international students, expatriates, and their families can experience more successful academic, professional, and personal lives in the Unites States.

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Dr. Tara Madden-Dent Prepares International Students to Successfully Study in the U.S.

Studying in the United States may be more difficult and costly than you realize.  Transitioning and adjusting in the U.S. culture may impose significant professional, academic, health, and safety hardships on international students which negatively impact their success.  After extensive research and experience, Dr. Tara Madden-Dent has developed the 10 most effective transition and adjustment strategies for international students to save time and money while living healthier and happier lives during their formative time at a U.S. college or university.

Partner with cultural relocation and adjustment expert, Dr. Tara Madden-Dent, and learn the most efficient strategies to thrive in the U.S.  culture and achieve your academic and professional goals.  She will help you develop the necessary skills required to navigate your new city, college campus, work environment, and  succeed in today’s complex culture.

To avoid common negative acculturation hardships that most newcomers experience, contact Dr. Madden-Dent who will personally guide you as an American Ambassador throughout the transition and adjustment process.  Feel safer, healthier, more connected, and more confident at school, home, work, and in your community.  Contact Dr. Madden-Dent at tara@taramaddendent.com or visit hlslinstitute.org to learn more.

Welcome & Introduction Video: Dr. Tara Madden-Dent

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I’m a Ph.D. and LOVING IT! Watch my dissertation presentation in under 3 minutes.

It feels AMAZING to have walked across the stage at the University of Nevada’s graduation commencement to officially recognize my Ph.D. in Educational Leadership specializing in international education.  To top things off, I’ve received second place for a fun university competition called the “3 Minute Dissertation Presentation”.  My short (< 3 minute) video summarizes my dissertation.  My full +200 page paper is published through the ProQuest Dissertation Database.  To learn more about my research without reading the entire document, you can always post a comment on this blog and we’ll discuss it.

 

I look forward to applying my research as I teach international people pursuing life, work, and studies in the United States.  If you are interested in learning more about how I applying my findings into practice, visit HLSL Institute.  Not only am I working in the United States, but I am available for international speaking, teaching, and training assignments. Contact me and we’ll schedule your next cross-cultural preparation workshop or seminar to prepare students, employees, or family members for successful transition and adjustment into the U.S.

 

 

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International Teaching Interview: TeachingTraveling.com features HLSL Insitute

TeachingTraveling.com features HLSL Insitute

Lillie Marshall (@WorldLillie), creator of www.TeachingTraveling.com interviewed Tara Madden-Dent about HLSL Institute.

The interview discussed how How Leaders Should Lead Institute teachers can work from anywhere and how HLSL Institute helps international students succeed during U.S. study abroad. The interview identifies how HLSL Institute helps people from all around the world, how educators can become more culturally competent, and how it provides cultural education.

To read the interview, read it below or visit A Job Teaching International Students About American Culture.

Tara Madden-Dent, an international educator and University Instructor, has a passion to stimulate a global dialog about culture and education.

The article:

Tara at the University of Nevada's Child Development Classroom.

Teaching Traveling: Welcome to Tara Madden-Dent, founder of the HLSL Institute: an innovative program to help international students transition into U.S. culture. 

TT: Tara, tell us about your background:.

Tara: It’s a relatively short commute from home in Lake Tahoe to work at the University of Nevada. I’ve taught undergraduate and graduate students “Education and Society”, “Nevada School Law”, & “Children and Families in Multiethnic Societies”. I love what I do, especially when it deals with cultural studies. My Ph.D. is almost finished which specializes in international education and cross-cultural adaptation. That’s why I expanded my profession to include HLSL Institute: a hybrid teaching program instructing international students (from around the world) how to transition into the U.S. culture. I get to teach from anywhere.

International student introducing an American Ambassador to friends back home.

(right) International student introducing an American Ambassador to friends back home.

TT: Tell us more about your world exploration. 

Tara: Although I’ve traveled to many countries for pleasure and professional reasons, an interesting aspect of my current role at HLSL Institute is that I can experience a variety of cultures from anywhere. For example, I’m currently teaching or working with South Koreans, Chinese, and Japanese students in their home country because of technology. When they arrive in the U.S, we can continue working online or also face-to-face.

How cool is it that I get paid to teach about U.S. culture to people from around the world while they teach me about their culture? Often times we become great friends and now have places to stay when we do travel internationally. Is there a better job than that?

Tara in Jamaica: Working from the sandy beaches of Negril.

(right) Tara in Jamaica: Working from the sandy beaches of Negril.

TT: Amazing! How did you find this opportunity?

Tara: HLSL Institute is my creation. After years of research, the need for it was too great to overlook. I now watch American Ambassadors (my teachers) transforming our students’ lives as they transition into the U.S. culture. My international students and expatriates (including their families) now seek me out because the educational program works. I can go into theory and describe my research, but in short, those who learn from a trained, caring local mentor/teacher or friend, have a better transition. That’s how this opportunity found me: I was that friend.

TT: Love it. Tell us one moment from your international connections that was particularly powerful.

Tara: One day, a woman in her 40’s from Cuba contacted me and wanted to meet. She was beautiful, kind, and funny. That’s why my heart broke when her tears began muffling her story.

Apparently, she had been in the U.S. for about 6 months after arriving with her husband (an expatriate contracted in the U.S. for one year). She still had no friends, knew almost no English, and was terrified to leave the house without her husband. This moment changed my life. Here I was, a person seeking to know this culture, befriend and teach people like her, and she was hiding at home too afraid to pick up a ringing telephone. She said, “I feel like I’m shrinking. I’m lonely, sad, and afraid”. I knew right then that teaching international sojourners was my destiny.

Teaching from laptops to international students across the globe.

Teaching from laptops to international students all the way across the globe.

TT: So powerful. You’re doing important work! How have your travels impacted you as a teacher and in your HLSL career?

Tara: There is a common theme that I’ve witnessed during my travels and interactions with various cultures that directly impacts my teaching. It’s that compassion and empathy is understood by all cultures and creates an authentic connection transcending cultural or language differences. Knowing this helps me connect with my students regardless of where they originate from. For example, a woman from Iran recently told me that our “inner connection” was stronger than our language gaps. She felt that “we are the same”, that we were friends. I saw that this made her more comfortable to engage with other U.S. natives and that’s what I’m all about.

TT: Beautiful. How has travel impacted you as a person?

T: It’s all about learning. As a life-long international learner, travel provides infinite opportunity to expand my identity. People, languages, cultures, food, music, history, religions, etc. help shape my worldviews and my ability to contribute a lasting valuable legacy. I’m a better leader and global citizen because of my travels.

Tara at the Pantheon in Italy: Experiencing Rome while teaching about U.S. culture.

(right) Tara at the Pantheon in Italy: Experiencing Rome while teaching about U.S. culture.

TT: What advice do you have for teachers who are dreaming of travel, or travelers dreaming of teaching?

T: The world is your oyster! International education is on the rise every year (thus, increasing a need for teachers) and with technology, you can teach from anywhere. First, search the internet for grants and scholarships to teach or travel abroad and for positions, then, commit! More opportunities will present themselves as your travels unfold. You don’t need to know how your travel story or teaching story ends, just begin the story and see where it takes you. There are tons of blogs and tools to learn the tricks to succeed at both travel and teaching, but you need to make the decision to commit. Once you do, it’s a win-win lifestyle and the benefits are infinite.

TT: Thanks so much, Tara! Readers, what questions or comments do you have? 

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My Interview with TeachingTraveling.com about HLSL Insitute

How fun is it to participate with Lillie Marshall (@WorldLillie) on www.TeachingTraveling.com?!!  It’s a blast!

As a featured guest, my interview discusses how I can teach from anywhere while expanding How Leaders Should Lead Institute. We discuss how HLSL Institute helps people from all around the world, how educators can become more culturally competent, and introduces cultural education.

Check out A Job Teaching International Students About American Culture to read the interview and share your thoughts.

As an international educator and University Instructor, I’m thrilled to be a part of the diverse global dialog about culture and education.

 HLSL Institute Featured Article

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What is Cultural Competence?

A student of mine shared a link to the State of Washington’s Superintendent of Public Instruction website during a discussion about cultural competence.
The website shared the following definition of what cultural competence is and what it is not.

“…cultural competence goes beyond memorizing a checklist of surface-level customs and cultural differences.
Cultural competence allows educators to ask questions about their practice in order to successfully teach students who come from different cultural backgrounds.

Developing skills in cultural competence is like learning a language, a sport or an instrument. The learner must learn, re-learn, continuously practice, and develop in an environment of constant change. Cultures and individuals are dynamic — they constantly adapt and evolve.

Cultural competence is:

•Knowing the community where the school is located.
•Understanding all people have a unique world view.
•Using curriculum that is respectful of and relevant to the cultures represented in its student body.
•Being alert to the ways that culture affects who we are.
•Placing the locus of responsibility on the professional and the institution.
•Examining systems, structures, policies and practices for their impact on all students and families.

Cultural competence is not:

•Good intentions.
•Cultural celebrations at designated times of the year, in designated ways.
•Kumbaya diversity.
•A list of stereotypes about what people from a particular cultural group do.
•Assumptions that all students from one culture operate in similar ways and have had similar experiences.
•The responsibility of children, their parents or the community.
•Color-blindness (treating everybody the same).
•Simple tolerance.”

As future educators and school administrators, we need to identify how intercultural and cross-cultural competence influences teacher preparation, student development, curriculum design, and educational policy.

“As educators, we want the best for students and seek ways to meet the needs of all learners in our classrooms. We sometimes find that this requires skills and knowledge far above and beyond the content area we are teaching…
Cultural competence provides a set of skills that professionals need in order to improve practice to serve all students and communicate effectively with their families. These skills enable the educator to build on the cultural and language qualities that young people bring to the classroom rather than viewing those qualities as deficits.

Cultural competence training asks educators to confront the stereotypes held both consciously and unconsciously about students. Bias affects the way that we perceive and teach students and has the potential to negatively affect student achievement.

Teachers who aspire to become more culturally competent can build relationships based on trust with students and their families, even though they experience the world in different ways. This is essential to closing academic achievement gaps and to fulfilling all students’ civil right to a quality education.”

My students are primarily future teachers and administrators. Read the comment section of “Cultural Studies & International Education” for a very interesting dialog about how they perceive the roll of multicultural, intercultural, and cross-cultural K12 education.  Other resources are introduced such as a great video: Why We Need Multicultural Education and a helpful webpage: Building Culturally Competent Organizations.

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Study Abroad in the U.S. with HLSL Institute

Did you know that the United States continues to be a top study abroad destination for international students?  There have been significant enrollment increases of international students in the U.S. higher education system over the past six years.  In fact, there was a 6.5% increase in 2012 from the previous year reaching a record high of 764,495 international students studying in the United States.  Overall, by 2025, more than 8 million students are projected to be studying outside their home country.  The largest international student population studying in the U.S. is Chinese students. Twenty-five percent of all international students studying in the U.S. are from Mainland China and Taiwan.  Research suggests that this increasing trend will continue.

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But does this matter and is it this trend a good thing?  Yes and yes.  International students heighten global diversity awareness on campuses helping colleges and universities achieve their diversity missions, contribute to high quality research, and provide significant financing to institutions and to the U.S. economy.  Did you know that international students are a foreign policy asset contributing almost $22 billion annually to the U.S. economy?  Yes, I said $22 billion.  

But in order to maintain status as a top study abroad destination, the U.S. needs to begin investing in intercultural and cross-cultural research as well as specialized cultural services to address international student needs.

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You see, there’s a large array of transitional difficulties  impacting international students’ academic, social, and  professional success.  These students often struggle with language barriers, transportation challenges, social relationships, cultural differences, healthcare options, work (or lack thereof), life planning skills, new living conditions, and other cultural stresses. Many international students have described their campus’s services as limited and often inconsistent in helping with their cultural adaptation.  In fact, most cross-cultural competency training only begins after international students arrive to their U.S. campus during their stressful first semester.

Cultural competence training does contribute to greater intercultural sensitivity and cross-cultural adaptation. In fact, cultural preparation and training supports student academic success and their overall wellness. 
In addition, earlier cross-cultural preparation and more experience with or knowledge about a foreign culture, can help international students transition into the U.S. culture faster.  So, we know what needs to be done, what are some ways to implement earlier and more effective cultural preparation for this emerging student population?

HLSLinstituteLOGO

There is one academic pedagogical model, grounded on cross-cultural adaptation theory and student development theories, that prepares international students for successful cross-cultural adjustment and academic success: How Leaders Should Lead Institute (HLSL Institute).  HLSL Institute has studied the unique needs of international students as well as campus best practices to address their unique transitional needs.  Its programs are organized in three cross-cultural phases to meet this demographics unique academic adjustment needs:

  1. Predeparture cross-cultural training before international students come to the U.S.
  2. Post-arrival cross-cultural training during their studies abroad
  3. Repatriation preparation and/or professional development

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 Becoming a significant resource to improve study abroad, HLSL  Institute works with public or private, two-year or four-year,  traditional or online institutions to attract, recruit, retain, and  graduate successful international students.  As study abroad  enrollment steadily increases, so too will the demand for higher quality cross-cultural student services.

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In addition to students, HLSL Institute serves all  new international travelers, expatriates, or persons relocating to  a new culture in the U.S.  To contact a program director or learn  more information about HLSL Institute, visit www.hlslinstitute.org.

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College Students: Degrees, Employment, & Preparation

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Getting a college degree is no longer enough to land a job after graduation.  Today’s students must take into account not only what they would like to to with their academic training, but what employment opportunities will be available by the time they graduate and how to promote their skills to attract future employment.

According to Celine James in a recent article, Who Should Decide Your College Major, there is strong need for academic programs to better reflect job market trends and for students to be aware of which academic programs will satisfy economic demands by the time of their graduation.  The article states, “As a student, your potential earned income and long-term job prospects should weigh heavily in the decisions you make about majors, degrees and programs… and to weigh the research with your own personal interests and needs”.  In addition, the article introduces some federal funding efforts and legislation intending to incentivize specific degrees in order to help satisfy future employment needs.

Deciding on a college degree or major can be a process to which requires significant consideration.  Pennsylvania State University has shared that 80% of college students are undecided about their college major during their first semester and that 50% of college students switch majors at least once during their academic career.  Penn State recommends that students begin to investigate their academic/professional interests early and provides helpful resources to do so.  One example includes “Major Decisions” written by Michael Leonard.  Remember, while deciding on a degree or major, be sure to balance your academic interest with its practical application in the job market 4-6 years for now.  The next step is to begin marketing yourself for that employment during your college experience.

Two previously discussed examples of how students and faculty can increase their attractiveness for employment include College = Employment and Social Business in Higher Education.   Students must now more than ever, build a professional profile marketing them as a viable job candidate.   Teresa Crane discusses a few strategies that students can practice during and after their academic career to increase professionalism and stand out from their competition.  In her recent article, Career Skills You Won’t Learn in School, she shares the following strategies to become more professionally attractive:

  • Identifying Potential Employers
  • Establish Your Online Presence
  • Develop A Job Search Strategy
  • Networking Skills
  • Job Searching Skills
  • Resumes
  • Cover Letters
  • Job Interviews
  • Job Offers
  • Persistence Skills
  • Future of Work

Finally, if you’re an international college student in the U.S, it can be more difficult getting a job after graduation.  These students often struggle with additional challenges including language, legislative, and cultural barriers.  In response, many of them are now outsourcing new resources that link academic preparation with professional development to enhance their likelihood of post graduation employment.  One educational service includes How Leaders Should Lead Institute (HLSL Institute) which specializes in cross-cultural adaptation in the U.S. International students receive help before, during, and after graduation through an individualized academic plan to manage academic requirements, professional goals, and the skills needed to achieve those goals.

CRUX: Getting a college degree is no longer enough to land a job after graduation.  Today’s students must plan ahead for long-term employment trends, create a personal brand to market their qualifications, as well as consider new professional development options.

I wish this fall semester’s students much success.

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International Graduate Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (China)

I’d like to thank my student Sarah for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Lai Wei for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from China.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Lai Wei’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Culture differences & the language terms and phrases.
  • She copes with challenges by asking lots of questions about the culture, working hard, and by practicing English with roommates, friends, and student colleagues.
  • She likes the U.S. culture, friendly people, food, education system, technology, & shopping.
  • She recommends that international students know the language, be open-minded before you arrive with flexible expectations of what students will experience.
  • It has been a challenge not having family living in the U.S. but she did have friends from China studying in the U.S.
  • She uses Q.Q. (like Skype) and email helps to connect her to friends and family back home.  (Time difference is difficult).
  • Study Abroad Rewards:  New language skills, professional development, access to good education systems, cultural awareness.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, the Congo, Japan, Mexico, London, & Netherlands.  Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

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International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (France)

I’d like to thank my student Adriana for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Mathieu for sharing his story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of an international student from France.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Mathieu’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Culture differences, English language terms and phrases, making friends, separation from friends/family from France.
  • He coped with challenges by studying hard, working on his English accent, communicating with Americans the majority of the time.  Living with American peers, playing tennis, and being in high school helped adaptation.
  • Food was much different/ a challenge.
  • He likes the U.S. culture/diversity
  • He recommends that international students get involved with local people, groups, and culture as soon as they can.  Learn the language and adapt.
  • Skype and email is fast and personal communication to connect with family/friends back home.
  • Study Abroad Rewards:  New language skills, professional development, job opportunities, access to good education systems, cultural awareness.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, the Congo, Japan, Mexico, London, & Netherlands.  Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

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International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Netherlands)

I’d like to thank my student Danielle for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Emma for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Netherlands.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Emma’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Academic differences, legal challenges, language, & culture shock.
  • She coped with challenges with support from her teammates, her coach, and her American boyfriend.  Her class work improved by practicing speaking and writing with friends and her boyfriend.  They would edit and proofread papers.
  • She likes the U.S. culture, sunny weather, friendly people, and convenience for travel.
  • Emma recommends that international students pick a U.S. city that will make you happy (big city verse small town), go to the U.S. alone (make American friends and get involved with the new culture).
  • It has been a challenge not having family or friends living in the U.S. but email and social media helps connect to them back home.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, the Congo, Japan, Mexico, and London.  Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

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International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (London, England)

I’d like to thank my student Delvonya for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Patrick Nyeko for sharing his story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from London, England.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Patrick’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language, homesickness, culture shock.
  • He coped with language challenges by practicing “American English” speaking and writing skills every day by taking classes and practicing with friends.
  • It was difficult competing with student peers and teammates because he felt he was at a disadvantage by not knowing the culture as he struggled with missing home, family, and friends.  He used social media and email to connect those back home.
  • The basketball team was a support and the athletic scholarship was helpful.
  • There was no structured cultural transition assistance.
  • He likes the U.S. culture, food, cars, big roads, diversity, the “American Dream” and freedom to create himself and be an individual.
  • Patrick recommends that international students and travelers “get your papers right” and follow visa or passport processes.  Also, know someone in the U.S. before you move here.  Having no family or friends living in the U.S. was a challenge for Patrick.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, the Congo, Japan, and Mexico.  Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

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International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (China)

I’d like to thank my student Sarah for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank NingXin Wang for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from China.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of NingXin Wang’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language, making friends, and culture shock.
  • She coped with language challenges by practicing English and writing skills with family and taking classes.
  • It was difficult making American friends.  She flew home to China a lot to cope with culture shock.  She tried fitting in with American friends by helping them get better grades (cheating) and trying to be seen as popular or cool.
  • American classroom culture is very different.  She stated that students are rude to teachers, she got bullied, and coursework progressed slowly.
  • She still feels pressure because of Asian stereotypes. Language and American phrases is still a struggle.
  • Being separated from family can be very challenging but she uses Skype & WeChat to communicate often.
  • She likes the U.S. culture and diversity.
  • NingXin Wang recommends that international students and travelers “be open-minded” and practice English often.
  • Having a family member living in the U.S. helped NingXin’s adjustment.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, the Congo, Japan, and Mexico.  Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

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International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (El Salvador)

I’d like to thank my student Sarah Bellows for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Alex for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from El Salvador.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Alex’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language, making friends, and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with family & Truckee Meadows Community College classes.   She has made American friends through classes and work.
  • Being separated from family can be very challenging but she visits home and uses Facebook, Skype, and email to communicate often.
  • She likes the U.S. culture and educational system.  She considers the U.S. as her home.
  • Alex recommends that international students and travelers make the move to America by following all legal processes and paperwork.
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases professional development, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

 

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, the Congo, and Japan.  Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

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International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Japan)

I’d like to thank my student Emily Thibault for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Akane Hagiya for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Japan.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Akane’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language, making friends, and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with friends/teammates/family & taking English classes.  She had made more friends by getting involved with sports, classmates, and roommates.  Experiencing American cultural traditions (Thanksgiving dinner) with host country nationals was helpful.  Being separated from family can be very challenging but she used Skype and email to stay in touch.
  • Akane shares that weekly dinners with other international students and with American teachers and families are very helpful.
  • She likes the U.S. culture and educational system.
  • Akane recommends that that international students make new American friends and join their groups to practice English.  Getting out of your comfort zone will help you fully learn about the American culture.
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases professional development, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, and the Congo.  Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

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Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Congo & Gabon, South Africa)

I’d like to thank my student Kayla Williams for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Mireille (Mimi) for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Congo, Africa.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Mimi’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with friends/teammates/family & taking English classes. She had made more friends by getting involved with sports.  Being separated from family can be very challenging but she used social media and phone calls to stay in touch.  (Skype).
  • When Mimi came to the U.S., she knew people here which is helpful.
  • She likes the U.S. culture and freedom of speech.
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases professional development, athletic opportunities, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews with Jiao Jiao from Beijing, China, Nikki from Vietnam, or Chavisa from Bangkok, Thailand. Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

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