Tag Archives: U.S. Higher Education

New U.S. Class for International Students

Prepare for USA College and University!

young man using tablet

Take Your First U.S. University Class Online with a U.S. Professor

Class Name: U.S. Academics and Culture

Class Topics:  Western Academics, Culture and Communication, Professional Readiness

Student Rewards:  U.S. Transcript Record with 3 Class Credits, Letter of Recommendation, Certificate of Completion

Class Introduction Video: https://youtu.be/fdtVvKSHqew

Website: www.USAclass.online

Who should enroll?

  • Students who want to prepare for U.S. study
  • Students who want to become more competitive
  • Students 14 years old, or older who can complete the class in English

What do students learn?

  • Success strategies for U.S. study and cultural adjustment
  • Western interaction and communication styles
  • Professional development and networking skills
  • Western student responsibilities
  • University communication, readiness, & socialization skills

When to enroll?

  • A new class starts the first Monday of every month
  • Upcoming class start dates:
    • June 6, July 4, Aug 1, Sept 5, Oct 3, Nov 7, Dec 5
  • Students must complete the class within 12 weeks from the official class start date
  • Students finish class at their pace

Why students enroll?

  • To become ready for U.S.education and western culture
  • To earn a letter of recommendation (in English) from a U.S. Professor
  • To earn a Certificate of Completion for resumes and school applications
  • To earn 3 U.S. university credits towards an undergraduate degree
  • To save money online compared to taking the class in the U.S.
  • To complete their first university class at their pace, conveniently online

 

Student Quotes:

“Knowing culture before coming to U.S. decreases anxiety for adjusting to new country. Just for my culture, I think it’s really mandatory, before.”

— Minjae L., Seoul, South Korea

“Knowing culture gave me confidence to talk, get involved, and participate.”

— Wayne L. Beijing, China

“It is helpful to learn American subjects using the class videos. I feel more able to express myself when I get to the California school.”

— Jackie Wang

“This study is helpful for me. It helped mentally prepare me studying and to meeting new friends.”

— Wei C., Shanghai, China

 

 

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3 Min Research Intro: New Pre-departure Course for International Students which also Recruits and Retains

Interested in learning why U.S. higher education is now offering pre-departure academic and cultural college prep courses to international students in foreign countries? Student success, international recruitment, and retention rates are definitely some benefits.

This video provides a 3 minute introduction to the research that led to today’s revolutionary international study abroad prep-classes.

First tested at a U.S. research university, then applied to HLSL Institute’s 2014 International Education Tour in South Korea and China, and now offered at U.S. schools, “U.S. Academics and Culture”, is an online or hybrid pre-departure school readiness class that strengthens academic performance, communication skills, and cultural adjustment. This student support effort also helps international students be healthier, safer, happier, and more professionally prepared in the U.S.

Because this classes teaches international students more accurate expectations about study, life, language, and work during first year experiences in the USA, high schools and universities can provide it simultaneously address recruitment, integration, and retention issues. Research findings indicated that international students are more confident (less stressed) to leave home and study in the USA, gain U.S. cultural knowledge and U.S. academic skills, better communicate with US natives and build more U.S. friendships, gain networking and small-talk skills, and better understand the importance for campus engagement and support resources.

U.S. institutions are now offering and/or requiring this class to prospective and newly admitted international students and domestic students before study abroad.  Sierra Nevada College was the first private college who made the online class available to any international student in efforts to welcome and encourage them to the USA.

P.s.  This class can also be effective for first-year international students who are already in the U.S. to aid with their transition, adjustment, and integration.

Contact me to learn how your U.S. high school or university can offer a pre-departure class like “U.S. Academics and Culture”.

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2014 International Education Tour in Seoul & Beijing: August – October

gradiStock_000020829404_SmallStudent: “What’s up Doc? Have any plans now that your dissertation is finished?” 

Me:  “I’m teaching my research in Korea and China.  My participants supported me and now I will support them.” 

Many people are surprised that I am not pursuing a traditional tenure-track career and instead, doing something completely foreign… literally foreign.  I’m teaching my research overseas on a 2014 International Education Tour in Seoul, South Korea and Beijing, China.  By partnering with Eastern Asian schools, colleges, and universities, I’m offering seminars about U.S. college success skills and cultural competencies to prepare students for United States studies.

 “There’s plenty of intelligence in the world, but the courage to do things differently is in short supply.” ~Marily Vos Savant

Typically U.S. colleges teach international students about U.S. culture and academic systems during the first week of school.  It’s often difficult learning during this time since students are already overwhelmed with moving into a new apartment, finding transportation, completing course placement tests, and buying textbooks while feeling jet lagged, knowing little English, and being alone in a foreign county.  The coolest part of teaching across the world will be seeing Korean and Chinese students learn how to succeed in the U.S. BEFORE they leave their homes.

My 2014 international education tour will help Korean and Chinese students prepare for life and studies the U.S. and thus, adjust to the academic and community culture faster.  These students will gain the knowledge, skills, and confidence to fully receive a quality, safe, and fun U.S. college experience.  Participants will be better prepared to earn higher grades, meet new U.S. friends, network with faculty, develop English skills, and avoid unnecessary acculturation stresses during their initial transition.

The tour’s theme is the “10 Best Strategies to Adjust and Succeed in the United States”.  For example, one of my seminars will be hosted at the prestigious Sookmyung Women’s University located in Seoul, South Korea.  I’m thrilled to collaborate with the Asia Institute and the HLSL Institute to teach 100 students in a three hour seminar consisting of traditional lecture, common U.S. classroom activities, guest speakers, group work, student and faculty videos, and an interactive workbook.  Together, we will provide these students with the elite preparation (knowledge and skills) to become excellent students in the U.S.

Study in the U.S.A.

Study in the U.S.A.

“미국대학에적응하고성공하기위한 10가지전략”

이세미나는학생들이미국대학에서또는다른교육기관에서공부할때미국의문화로적응하고, 건강, 안전, 성적, 전문적기술, 영어능력등을향상시키는것을준비하도록도와줍니다.

학생들은연구조사, 시범설명, 강의, 활동, 인터액티브워크북(Interactive Workbook), 초청연사, 학생, 학생경험담, 질의응답의순서로세미나를접하게됩니다.

성공적인유학을위해대단히중요하고유용한시간이될것입니다.

Visit www.studyusaseminar.eventbrite.com to enroll in the Seoul seminar on September 15, 2014 6-9 pm.

Schools or agencies in Beijing, China and Seoul, South Korea are invited to contact Dr. Tara Madden-Dent about collaborating during the 2014 tour and future tours (i.e. school visits, lectures, and seminars, etc). 

“Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. ~Ralph Waldo Emerson.

 

 

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Video Interview: International Student from France

Thanks to Brit, my UNR student, for conducting an interview with Victor, an international student from France.  Victor revealed many interesting topics and challenges that one faces when traveling to the United States from another country. These cross-cultural challenges bring many opportunities for new programs and ideas to help ease the transition into our very unique culture.

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Study Abroad in the U.S. with HLSL Institute

Did you know that the United States continues to be a top study abroad destination for international students?  There have been significant enrollment increases of international students in the U.S. higher education system over the past six years.  In fact, there was a 6.5% increase in 2012 from the previous year reaching a record high of 764,495 international students studying in the United States.  Overall, by 2025, more than 8 million students are projected to be studying outside their home country.  The largest international student population studying in the U.S. is Chinese students. Twenty-five percent of all international students studying in the U.S. are from Mainland China and Taiwan.  Research suggests that this increasing trend will continue.

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But does this matter and is it this trend a good thing?  Yes and yes.  International students heighten global diversity awareness on campuses helping colleges and universities achieve their diversity missions, contribute to high quality research, and provide significant financing to institutions and to the U.S. economy.  Did you know that international students are a foreign policy asset contributing almost $22 billion annually to the U.S. economy?  Yes, I said $22 billion.  

But in order to maintain status as a top study abroad destination, the U.S. needs to begin investing in intercultural and cross-cultural research as well as specialized cultural services to address international student needs.

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You see, there’s a large array of transitional difficulties  impacting international students’ academic, social, and  professional success.  These students often struggle with language barriers, transportation challenges, social relationships, cultural differences, healthcare options, work (or lack thereof), life planning skills, new living conditions, and other cultural stresses. Many international students have described their campus’s services as limited and often inconsistent in helping with their cultural adaptation.  In fact, most cross-cultural competency training only begins after international students arrive to their U.S. campus during their stressful first semester.

Cultural competence training does contribute to greater intercultural sensitivity and cross-cultural adaptation. In fact, cultural preparation and training supports student academic success and their overall wellness. 
In addition, earlier cross-cultural preparation and more experience with or knowledge about a foreign culture, can help international students transition into the U.S. culture faster.  So, we know what needs to be done, what are some ways to implement earlier and more effective cultural preparation for this emerging student population?

HLSLinstituteLOGO

There is one academic pedagogical model, grounded on cross-cultural adaptation theory and student development theories, that prepares international students for successful cross-cultural adjustment and academic success: How Leaders Should Lead Institute (HLSL Institute).  HLSL Institute has studied the unique needs of international students as well as campus best practices to address their unique transitional needs.  Its programs are organized in three cross-cultural phases to meet this demographics unique academic adjustment needs:

  1. Predeparture cross-cultural training before international students come to the U.S.
  2. Post-arrival cross-cultural training during their studies abroad
  3. Repatriation preparation and/or professional development

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 Becoming a significant resource to improve study abroad, HLSL  Institute works with public or private, two-year or four-year,  traditional or online institutions to attract, recruit, retain, and  graduate successful international students.  As study abroad  enrollment steadily increases, so too will the demand for higher quality cross-cultural student services.

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In addition to students, HLSL Institute serves all  new international travelers, expatriates, or persons relocating to  a new culture in the U.S.  To contact a program director or learn  more information about HLSL Institute, visit www.hlslinstitute.org.

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College Students: Degrees, Employment, & Preparation

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Getting a college degree is no longer enough to land a job after graduation.  Today’s students must take into account not only what they would like to to with their academic training, but what employment opportunities will be available by the time they graduate and how to promote their skills to attract future employment.

According to Celine James in a recent article, Who Should Decide Your College Major, there is strong need for academic programs to better reflect job market trends and for students to be aware of which academic programs will satisfy economic demands by the time of their graduation.  The article states, “As a student, your potential earned income and long-term job prospects should weigh heavily in the decisions you make about majors, degrees and programs… and to weigh the research with your own personal interests and needs”.  In addition, the article introduces some federal funding efforts and legislation intending to incentivize specific degrees in order to help satisfy future employment needs.

Deciding on a college degree or major can be a process to which requires significant consideration.  Pennsylvania State University has shared that 80% of college students are undecided about their college major during their first semester and that 50% of college students switch majors at least once during their academic career.  Penn State recommends that students begin to investigate their academic/professional interests early and provides helpful resources to do so.  One example includes “Major Decisions” written by Michael Leonard.  Remember, while deciding on a degree or major, be sure to balance your academic interest with its practical application in the job market 4-6 years for now.  The next step is to begin marketing yourself for that employment during your college experience.

Two previously discussed examples of how students and faculty can increase their attractiveness for employment include College = Employment and Social Business in Higher Education.   Students must now more than ever, build a professional profile marketing them as a viable job candidate.   Teresa Crane discusses a few strategies that students can practice during and after their academic career to increase professionalism and stand out from their competition.  In her recent article, Career Skills You Won’t Learn in School, she shares the following strategies to become more professionally attractive:

  • Identifying Potential Employers
  • Establish Your Online Presence
  • Develop A Job Search Strategy
  • Networking Skills
  • Job Searching Skills
  • Resumes
  • Cover Letters
  • Job Interviews
  • Job Offers
  • Persistence Skills
  • Future of Work

Finally, if you’re an international college student in the U.S, it can be more difficult getting a job after graduation.  These students often struggle with additional challenges including language, legislative, and cultural barriers.  In response, many of them are now outsourcing new resources that link academic preparation with professional development to enhance their likelihood of post graduation employment.  One educational service includes How Leaders Should Lead Institute (HLSL Institute) which specializes in cross-cultural adaptation in the U.S. International students receive help before, during, and after graduation through an individualized academic plan to manage academic requirements, professional goals, and the skills needed to achieve those goals.

CRUX: Getting a college degree is no longer enough to land a job after graduation.  Today’s students must plan ahead for long-term employment trends, create a personal brand to market their qualifications, as well as consider new professional development options.

I wish this fall semester’s students much success.

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International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Bangkok, Thailand)

I’d like to thank my student Dana Moreno for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Chavisa for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Bangkok, Thailand.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Chavisa’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with friends/teammates in addition to watching movies, listening to music, writing, and getting involved with activities to use the English language often.  She had made more friends by getting involved with sports.  Being separated from family can be very challenging but she used social media to stay in touch.   (Skype and Facebook).
  • When Chavisa came to the U.S., she knew people here which is helpful.  She also had experience in Australia which helped prepare her for life in the U.S.
  • She likes the U.S. culture, educational system, and diversity of people here
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases professional development, confidence, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews with Jiao Jiao from Beijing, China or Nikki from Vietnam. Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

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