Tag Archives: International Education

Video Interview: Korean Student Transitions to Reno, NV

Thanks to my student Yujin Kwak for conducting an interview with Woong Kim, an international student from Korea. Woong revealed many interesting topics and challenges that one faces when traveling to the United States from another country. These cross-cultural challenges bring many opportunities for new programs and ideas to help ease the transition into our very unique culture.

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

Video Interview: International Student from France

Thanks to Brit, my UNR student, for conducting an interview with Victor, an international student from France.  Victor revealed many interesting topics and challenges that one faces when traveling to the United States from another country. These cross-cultural challenges bring many opportunities for new programs and ideas to help ease the transition into our very unique culture.

1 Comment

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

Video Interview: International Student’s Transition (Vietnam to U.S.)

Thanks to my UNR student, Nicolette Rizzuto, for conducting an interview with Autumn , an international student from Vietnam.  Autumn revealed many interesting topics and challenges that one faces when traveling to the United States from another country. These cross-cultural challenges bring many opportunities for new programs and ideas to help ease the transition into our very unique culture.

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

Video Interview: International Student from Japan in Reno, NV

Thanks to my student Kristen VanCitters for conducting an interview with Moe Orihara, an international student from Tokyo, Japan,.  Moe revealed many interesting topics and challenges that one faces when traveling to the United States from another country. These cross-cultural challenges bring many opportunities for new programs and ideas to help ease the transition into our very unique culture.

Leave a comment

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Ph.D. Student Talks About Transition into Reno, NV

Filiz Gozenman, a Ph.D. student from Turkey shares about her transitional experience into Reno, NV.

3 short videos:

 

 

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

My Interview with TeachingTraveling.com about HLSL Insitute

How fun is it to participate with Lillie Marshall (@WorldLillie) on www.TeachingTraveling.com?!!  It’s a blast!

As a featured guest, my interview discusses how I can teach from anywhere while expanding How Leaders Should Lead Institute. We discuss how HLSL Institute helps people from all around the world, how educators can become more culturally competent, and introduces cultural education.

Check out A Job Teaching International Students About American Culture to read the interview and share your thoughts.

As an international educator and University Instructor, I’m thrilled to be a part of the diverse global dialog about culture and education.

 HLSL Institute Featured Article

1 Comment

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

What is Cultural Competence?

A student of mine shared a link to the State of Washington’s Superintendent of Public Instruction website during a discussion about cultural competence.
The website shared the following definition of what cultural competence is and what it is not.

“…cultural competence goes beyond memorizing a checklist of surface-level customs and cultural differences.
Cultural competence allows educators to ask questions about their practice in order to successfully teach students who come from different cultural backgrounds.

Developing skills in cultural competence is like learning a language, a sport or an instrument. The learner must learn, re-learn, continuously practice, and develop in an environment of constant change. Cultures and individuals are dynamic — they constantly adapt and evolve.

Cultural competence is:

•Knowing the community where the school is located.
•Understanding all people have a unique world view.
•Using curriculum that is respectful of and relevant to the cultures represented in its student body.
•Being alert to the ways that culture affects who we are.
•Placing the locus of responsibility on the professional and the institution.
•Examining systems, structures, policies and practices for their impact on all students and families.

Cultural competence is not:

•Good intentions.
•Cultural celebrations at designated times of the year, in designated ways.
•Kumbaya diversity.
•A list of stereotypes about what people from a particular cultural group do.
•Assumptions that all students from one culture operate in similar ways and have had similar experiences.
•The responsibility of children, their parents or the community.
•Color-blindness (treating everybody the same).
•Simple tolerance.”

As future educators and school administrators, we need to identify how intercultural and cross-cultural competence influences teacher preparation, student development, curriculum design, and educational policy.

“As educators, we want the best for students and seek ways to meet the needs of all learners in our classrooms. We sometimes find that this requires skills and knowledge far above and beyond the content area we are teaching…
Cultural competence provides a set of skills that professionals need in order to improve practice to serve all students and communicate effectively with their families. These skills enable the educator to build on the cultural and language qualities that young people bring to the classroom rather than viewing those qualities as deficits.

Cultural competence training asks educators to confront the stereotypes held both consciously and unconsciously about students. Bias affects the way that we perceive and teach students and has the potential to negatively affect student achievement.

Teachers who aspire to become more culturally competent can build relationships based on trust with students and their families, even though they experience the world in different ways. This is essential to closing academic achievement gaps and to fulfilling all students’ civil right to a quality education.”

My students are primarily future teachers and administrators. Read the comment section of “Cultural Studies & International Education” for a very interesting dialog about how they perceive the roll of multicultural, intercultural, and cross-cultural K12 education.  Other resources are introduced such as a great video: Why We Need Multicultural Education and a helpful webpage: Building Culturally Competent Organizations.

3 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Graduate Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (China)

I’d like to thank my student Sarah for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Lai Wei for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from China.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Lai Wei’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Culture differences & the language terms and phrases.
  • She copes with challenges by asking lots of questions about the culture, working hard, and by practicing English with roommates, friends, and student colleagues.
  • She likes the U.S. culture, friendly people, food, education system, technology, & shopping.
  • She recommends that international students know the language, be open-minded before you arrive with flexible expectations of what students will experience.
  • It has been a challenge not having family living in the U.S. but she did have friends from China studying in the U.S.
  • She uses Q.Q. (like Skype) and email helps to connect her to friends and family back home.  (Time difference is difficult).
  • Study Abroad Rewards:  New language skills, professional development, access to good education systems, cultural awareness.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, the Congo, Japan, Mexico, London, & Netherlands.  Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (France)

I’d like to thank my student Adriana for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Mathieu for sharing his story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of an international student from France.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Mathieu’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Culture differences, English language terms and phrases, making friends, separation from friends/family from France.
  • He coped with challenges by studying hard, working on his English accent, communicating with Americans the majority of the time.  Living with American peers, playing tennis, and being in high school helped adaptation.
  • Food was much different/ a challenge.
  • He likes the U.S. culture/diversity
  • He recommends that international students get involved with local people, groups, and culture as soon as they can.  Learn the language and adapt.
  • Skype and email is fast and personal communication to connect with family/friends back home.
  • Study Abroad Rewards:  New language skills, professional development, job opportunities, access to good education systems, cultural awareness.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, the Congo, Japan, Mexico, London, & Netherlands.  Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Australia)

I’d like to thank my student Elizabeth for her excellent final project: International Interview.  I would also like to thank Sarah from Australia for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of an international traveler from Australia.  I hope that this helps others coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Sarah’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international travelers.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Driving transportation rules & the language/slang terms and phrases.
  • She coped with challenges by asking lots of questions and by getting involved with supportive friends, work colleagues, and groups.
  • She likes the U.S. culture, friendly people, patriotism, food, & shopping.
  • Sarah recommends that international students be open-minded and try not to have expectations before traveling to the U.S. (be ready to try new things)
  • It has been a challenge not having family or friends living in the U.S. but Skype and email help to connect to them back home.  (Time difference is difficult).

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, the Congo, Japan, Mexico, London, & Netherlands.  Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

Leave a comment

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Netherlands)

I’d like to thank my student Danielle for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Emma for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Netherlands.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Emma’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Academic differences, legal challenges, language, & culture shock.
  • She coped with challenges with support from her teammates, her coach, and her American boyfriend.  Her class work improved by practicing speaking and writing with friends and her boyfriend.  They would edit and proofread papers.
  • She likes the U.S. culture, sunny weather, friendly people, and convenience for travel.
  • Emma recommends that international students pick a U.S. city that will make you happy (big city verse small town), go to the U.S. alone (make American friends and get involved with the new culture).
  • It has been a challenge not having family or friends living in the U.S. but email and social media helps connect to them back home.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, the Congo, Japan, Mexico, and London.  Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

Leave a comment

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Beijing, China)

I’d like to thank my student Briana for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Lucy for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Beijing, China.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Lucy’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Transportation, language, & culture shock.
  • Lucy coped with language challenges by practicing “American English” speaking and writing skills every day by taking classes, asking questions, practicing with friends.
  • She struggles with missing home, family, and friends.  She used social media, Q.Q. (like Facebook), email, and phone calls to connect those back home weekly.
  • Church has been a support system with learning how to drive, learning about the American culture, and practicing English.
  • She likes the U.S. culture, less traffic and number of people, convenience for shopping, snow skiing, and movies.
  • Lucy recommends that international students and travelers learn English and driving laws.  Also, make American friends in addition to friends from your own country to get involved and learn the culture.
  • She had a sister living in the U.S. and has been a helpful resource.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, the Congo, Japan, Mexico, and London.  Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

Leave a comment

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (London, England)

I’d like to thank my student Delvonya for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Patrick Nyeko for sharing his story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from London, England.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Patrick’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language, homesickness, culture shock.
  • He coped with language challenges by practicing “American English” speaking and writing skills every day by taking classes and practicing with friends.
  • It was difficult competing with student peers and teammates because he felt he was at a disadvantage by not knowing the culture as he struggled with missing home, family, and friends.  He used social media and email to connect those back home.
  • The basketball team was a support and the athletic scholarship was helpful.
  • There was no structured cultural transition assistance.
  • He likes the U.S. culture, food, cars, big roads, diversity, the “American Dream” and freedom to create himself and be an individual.
  • Patrick recommends that international students and travelers “get your papers right” and follow visa or passport processes.  Also, know someone in the U.S. before you move here.  Having no family or friends living in the U.S. was a challenge for Patrick.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, the Congo, Japan, and Mexico.  Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

Faculty Can Attract International Students & Faculty Using Social Business (In Nevada & Beyond)

Follow the link below for the PowerPoint Presentation: “Attracting International Students & Faculty via Social Business in Higher Education”

Social Business in Higher Education- IAIR 2013

Ppt Highlights

  • Social Business: Cyber marketing, networking, and publication via virtual platforms to promote a product or business.
  • Faculty can use the increasing traffic on social media sites to increase the attention to their research and institution.
  • Did you know that 70% of YouTube traffic comes from outside the U.S? Or that YouTube reaches more adults (ages: 18-34) than any cable network?
  • Consistent & transparent online  faculty personal branding can:

– Increase attention from students, faculty, donors, industry leaders, and others to faculty research, departments, & institutions

– Disseminate research faster and stimulate greater interest and collaboration in the field

– Increase professional development skills and make faculty more competitive in higher education markets

– Generate easier and faster communication as well as instructional resources

– Attract more international attention to faculty and their work 

As higher education becomes increasingly competitive, and the international student is sought after more by higher education institutions, faculty can help attract & recruit both in-state, out-of-state, and international students & faculty to their institution through social business strategies. Social business is cost effective and after its initial start-up, is easy to maintain.

Leave a comment

July 18, 2013 · 3:36 am

International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (China)

I’d like to thank my student Sarah for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank NingXin Wang for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from China.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of NingXin Wang’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language, making friends, and culture shock.
  • She coped with language challenges by practicing English and writing skills with family and taking classes.
  • It was difficult making American friends.  She flew home to China a lot to cope with culture shock.  She tried fitting in with American friends by helping them get better grades (cheating) and trying to be seen as popular or cool.
  • American classroom culture is very different.  She stated that students are rude to teachers, she got bullied, and coursework progressed slowly.
  • She still feels pressure because of Asian stereotypes. Language and American phrases is still a struggle.
  • Being separated from family can be very challenging but she uses Skype & WeChat to communicate often.
  • She likes the U.S. culture and diversity.
  • NingXin Wang recommends that international students and travelers “be open-minded” and practice English often.
  • Having a family member living in the U.S. helped NingXin’s adjustment.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, the Congo, Japan, and Mexico.  Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Mexico)

I’d like to thank my student Kourtney for her excellent final project: International Student Interview. I would also like to thank Amanda for sharing her story with us. Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Mexico. I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.
Many of Amanda’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students. The following key points are from the video:
•Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language, making friends, and transportation. She coped with language challenges by practicing with family. She has made American friends through her cousin. Until Amanda gets a drivers license, she relies on family to get around town.
•Being separated from family can be very challenging but she uses Skype and email to communicate often.
•She likes the U.S. culture and food the most.
•Amanda recommends that international students and travelers “Be proactive” by learning about where they’re moving to and to get involved with extracurricular activities. She joined a church and Cross-fit (gym exercise class).
•Having a family member living in the U.S. helped Amanda’s adjustment.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, the Congo, Japan, El Salvador. Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do. Thanks.
Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S. Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (El Salvador)

I’d like to thank my student Sarah Bellows for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Alex for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from El Salvador.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Alex’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language, making friends, and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with family & Truckee Meadows Community College classes.   She has made American friends through classes and work.
  • Being separated from family can be very challenging but she visits home and uses Facebook, Skype, and email to communicate often.
  • She likes the U.S. culture and educational system.  She considers the U.S. as her home.
  • Alex recommends that international students and travelers make the move to America by following all legal processes and paperwork.
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases professional development, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

 

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, the Congo, and Japan.  Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

Leave a comment

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Japan)

I’d like to thank my student Emily Thibault for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Akane Hagiya for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Japan.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Akane’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language, making friends, and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with friends/teammates/family & taking English classes.  She had made more friends by getting involved with sports, classmates, and roommates.  Experiencing American cultural traditions (Thanksgiving dinner) with host country nationals was helpful.  Being separated from family can be very challenging but she used Skype and email to stay in touch.
  • Akane shares that weekly dinners with other international students and with American teachers and families are very helpful.
  • She likes the U.S. culture and educational system.
  • Akane recommends that that international students make new American friends and join their groups to practice English.  Getting out of your comfort zone will help you fully learn about the American culture.
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases professional development, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews students from Beijing, China, Vietnam, Bangkok, Thailand, and the Congo.  Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Congo & Gabon, South Africa)

I’d like to thank my student Kayla Williams for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Mireille (Mimi) for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Congo, Africa.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Mimi’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with friends/teammates/family & taking English classes. She had made more friends by getting involved with sports.  Being separated from family can be very challenging but she used social media and phone calls to stay in touch.  (Skype).
  • When Mimi came to the U.S., she knew people here which is helpful.
  • She likes the U.S. culture and freedom of speech.
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases professional development, athletic opportunities, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews with Jiao Jiao from Beijing, China, Nikki from Vietnam, or Chavisa from Bangkok, Thailand. Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Bangkok, Thailand)

I’d like to thank my student Dana Moreno for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank Chavisa for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Bangkok, Thailand.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Chavisa’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with friends/teammates in addition to watching movies, listening to music, writing, and getting involved with activities to use the English language often.  She had made more friends by getting involved with sports.  Being separated from family can be very challenging but she used social media to stay in touch.   (Skype and Facebook).
  • When Chavisa came to the U.S., she knew people here which is helpful.  She also had experience in Australia which helped prepare her for life in the U.S.
  • She likes the U.S. culture, educational system, and diversity of people here
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases professional development, confidence, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the few weeks. Check out previous interviews with Jiao Jiao from Beijing, China or Nikki from Vietnam. Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Vietnam)

I’d like to thank my student Shirin Abboud for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank  Nhi (Nikki) Vuong for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Vietnam.  I hope that this helps students coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Nikki’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language, making friends, and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with friends/teammates in addition to watching movies, writing, asking questions, and getting involved with activities to use the English language often.  She made friends by being more outgoing and getting involved with sports.  Being separated from family can be very challenging but Nikki uses social media to stay in touch.
  • Nikki came to the U.S. with her immediate family so knowing someone here is helpful but it means that there are more cross-cultural complexities that come with more people transitioning into the U.S. culture.
  • She likes the U.S. culture/friendly people/diversity
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases confidence, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the three weeks. Check out last week’s interview with Jiao Jiao from Beijing, China. Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Student Interview: Cross-Cultural Adaptation (Beijing, China)

I’d like to thank my student Amanda Santos for her excellent final project: International Student Interview.  I would also like to thank  Mengjiao Mi “Jiao Jiao”, for sharing her story with us.  Because of their hard work, we have access to the cross-cultural experiences of a UNR international student from Beijing, China.  I hope that this helps students  coming to America as well as educators in America better prepare for study abroad’s challenges and rewards.

Many of Jiao Jiao’s cross-cultural adaptation and transitional challenges are shared among international students.  The following key points are from the video:

  • Jiao Jiao just graduated from the University of Nevada, Reno this month! Congrats Jiao Jiao!
  • Jiao Jiao is an accomplished UNR athlete (impressive dedication for her studies and sports commitments)
  • Cross-Cultural Challenges: Language, time management, and family separation.  She coped with language challenges by practicing with friends and teammates, asking questions, and getting involved with activities to use the English language often.  She coped with balancing academic and athletic responsibilities by structuring time management skills.  Being separated from friends and family can be very challenging but she used social media to connect and stay in touch.   Time differences were an issue but staying up late or getting up early to chat was worth it.
  • Jiao Jiao came to the U.S. without knowing anyone here. (That takes courage)
  • She likes the U.S. food (except raw,cold vegetables) & U.S. culture/friendly people (but was shocked about dating culture).
  • Jiao Jiao is planning on applying to UNR’s Public Health Masters program in 2014
  • Study Abroad Rewards: Increases confidence, knowledge/experience, open-mindedness.  Builds friendships, language skills, cultural competencies, international experience.

To provide more stories about study abroad in America, I will post a new international student interview from a different country each week for the next month. Hope you find this helpful and please comment if you do.  Thanks.

Also, HLSL Institute is a helpful resource for international students, travelers, expatriates and expatriate families coming to the U.S.    Check it out if you want help with cultural transition, language, transportation, and acculturation development.

2 Comments

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

Knock Knock…Who’s there? International Students and We Want Your Attention.

gradiStock_000020829404_Small

By 2025, more than 8 million students are projected to be studying abroad (outside their home country).  This increasing demand for international education presupposes a growing need for student support resources to accommodate a growing international student aggregate.  But as higher education systems struggle with state and federal disinvestment (funding and support), it will also struggle with providing necessary resources (staffing, space, funding, etc.) for student success.  In the midst of this academic conundrum, international students will seek what other options are available.  This is a problem for higher education since it already completes with public, private, online, for-profit and non-profit educational entities for quality international students.  The colleges and universities who can’t provide and support their current students won’t be able to attract/recruit new ones.

Did you know that international students have different needs than domestic/traditional students?  For example, the need for cross-cultural transition education directly impacts student performance.  Many colleges and universities don’t provide the cross-cultural support.  If it is provided, many services are often very minimal, provided long after the semester initiated, or are grant funded (which means the money can always be discontinued after the fixed contract).  This is truly unfortunate for the international student body.  Cultural differences between American college cultures and the norms of international students can influence academic success, social skills, psychological health, and professional development.

If students are not provided proper cross-cultural training before they arrive on American campuses and are not supported during post-induction cultural transitions, serious factors can derail their academic and professional goals (not to mention their overall wellness: psychological, emotional, financial, and physical wellbeing).

As higher education continues to feel the growing pains and pressures to enhance international student recruitment and retention, I believe there is a greater need to prioritize cross-cultural services.  If international students don’t experience a healthy transition, they are not as apt to succeed and pass their classes.

Leave a comment

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

Thank to my UNR student, Alyce for her wonderful final project interviewing Young Park. The transition into a new culture can be very challenging. Young introduces us to his cross-cultural experience.

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Higher Education, International Education

International Student Support Services

Image Source: http://ow.ly/fNAFh

Image Source: http://ow.ly/fNAFh

Twenty-first century higher education strives to prepare an educated and civilly responsible workforce, capable of succeeding in competitive, global markets. Globalization and higher education are interdependent systems benefiting from each other’s successes as well as impacted by each other’s forgone positive contributions. Globalization is not a trend, but a growing influence reshaping college campuses and employer demands. As technology, transportation, and communication evolve, international collaboration increases; thus, presupposing a greater need for educational systems to bridge diverse cultural gaps.

Globalization and technology trends presuppose the increased need for highly skilled college graduates with intercultural communication and adaptation skills. As international student enrollment increases, there will also be increasing pressures to develop effective international student support services and the evaluation of those services while competing with for-profit and nonprofit institutions. Greater linkage between higher education student support services and international student needs will foster communication and facilitate better transition into American college cultures; ultimately strengthening international student successes.

Cross-cultural awareness + sensitivity + competencies = intercultural adaptation

Cross-cultural: researching and understanding the similarities and differences between two cultures.
Intercultural: The interaction between two cultures.

The preliminary findings from my dissertation pilot study, “International Student Perception of a Pre-Departure Cross-cultural Competency Preparation: A Phenomenological Study”, found two main themes. The first was that inbound international students need specific and unique student support services (compared to traditional students) that directly impact their academic success. The primary need was for better English speaking (not writing) services. The second was that cultural preparation strategies for international students are needed to enhance student transition into the American higher education system. Specifically, socialization or “sticky campus” strategies that increase a balanced student engagement lifestyle were addressed.

The international student perspective demonstrated that an earlier intercultural intervention could improve student cross-cultural competencies and thus, intercultural adaptation into American college cultures and their academic success. These findings should encourage college and university administrators to more intentionally and accurately address international student needs, prescribe more effective campus support services, and consider developing pre-departure cultural preparation services to better serve international students before they arrive on campus.

If you have experienced effective cultural preparation strategies or would like to recommend helpful educational strategies, please share them in the comments section below.  Thank you for visiting taramaddendent.com.

Leave a comment

Filed under Higher Education, Leadership